Command Sgt. Maj. Frank Handoe, rear division command sergeant major, 4th Infantry Division and Fort Carson, serves a 4th Inf. Div. Soldier during the Thanksgiving meal at the James R. Wolfe Dining Facility, Fort Carson, Colorado, Nov. 20, 2018. Unit leaders traditionally serve their Soldiers during Thanksgiving as a way to demonstrate service and to express appreciation. (U.S. Army/Sgt. Asa Bingham)

Editor's Note: A version of this article was first published in 2016.

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DreamWorks Pictures

Editor's note: This story originally appeared in March 2016 and has been republished for the 20th anniversary of  'Saving Private Ryan'

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You’ve made career, relocation, and family decisions for what you’ll do after receiving your DD-214, but have you thought about what you’ll do with your hair?

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U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Kimberly Hackbarth

152 Thanksgivings. That’s how many our country has celebrated since the holiday’s national recognition. During that time, our armed forces have fought in numerous wars and conflicts, and many service members have spent Thanksgiving Day deployed in foreign countries or behind enemy lines. Despite huge nutritional and logistical challenges, the spirit of Thanksgiving has been alive and well in the armed forces for over a century. Here’s seven things you probably didn’t know about Thanksgiving and the military:

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Screenshot from YouTube

I’ll never forget the first time I saw “Apocalypse Now.” Captivated, I stared at the screen for the 196-minute runtime as Willard journeyed upriver in the midst of the Vietnam War to assassinate the general-turned-rogue-demigod Colonel Kurtz. Afterward, I felt disgusted, exhausted, relieved, and forever altered in my way of thinking about war.

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