The aircraft carriers USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76), USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) and USS Nimitz (CVN 68) Strike Groups and ships from the Republic of Korea Navy transit the Western Pacific Ocean Nov. 12, 2017. (U.S. Navy/ Lt. Aaron B. Hicks)

Editor's Note: This article by Matthew Cox originally appeared onMilitary.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

The new acting secretary of the Navy said recently that he is open to designing a fleet that is larger than the current 355-ship plan, one that relies significantly on unmanned systems rather than solely on traditional gray hulls.

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Photo: U.S. Army

Editor's Note: This article by Matthew Cox originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

Army equipment officials have issued a reminder to soldiers that the service's authorized protective eyewear list is being updated regularly with high-tech options like lenses that adjust to changing light in the blink of an eye.

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Editor's Note: This article by Matthew Cox originally appeared onMilitary.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

It may take up to five years to finalize the standards for the Army Combat Fitness Test as the service struggles to address the performance gap between male and female soldiers on the service's first-ever gender-neutral fitness assessment.

The Army just completed in late September a year-long field test of the ACFT, involving about 60 battalions of soldiers. And as of Oct. 1, soldiers in Basic Combat Training, advanced Individual training and one station unit training began to take the ACFT as a graduation requirement.

So far, the data is showing "about a 100 to a 110-point difference between men and women, on average," Maj. Gen. Lonnie Hibbard, commander of the Center for Initial Military Training, told Military.com.

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Staff Sgt. Tyler Lewis, a field artillery firefinder radar operator and Moore, Oklahoma, native, with 2nd Battalion, 3rd Field Artillery Regiment, 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Armored Division, displays his Expert Soldier Badge Oct. 15, 2019. (U.S. Army/Thomas Brading)

Editor's Note: This article by Matthew Cox originally appeared onMilitary.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS, Virginia -- Out of all the events of the recent five-day Expert Soldier Badge (ESB) testing here, navigating with a map and compass and the current Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) accounted for most ejections.

Of the 95 soldiers that began the first day of testing on Sunday, 26 failed the day land navigation test and seven no-goed on the night land nav course. On the same day, 26 soldiers failed to meet the ESB standard on the APFT -- for a total of 59 dropped from testing.

"I hate to say this, but we lost 64% ... for just [physical training] and land navigation alone -- 64%," said Command Sgt. Maj. Edward Mitchell, CSM for the Center for Initial Military Training (CIMT).

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Editor's Note: This article by Matthew Cox originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

Sig Sauer Inc. announced Friday that it has delivered 100,000 Modular Handgun Systems to the U.S. military as it approaches the three-year anniversary of the U.S. Army contract award.

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Spc. Jacob Rosser, with the 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, plots his next point during a land navigation portion of 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry Division's Expert Infantry and Expert Soldier Badge testing at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Oct. 27, 2019. (U.S. Army/ Spc. John Weaver)

Editor's Note: This article by Matthew Cox originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS, Virginia -- The Army's newest soldier skill test is proving to be a sobering reminder that many soldiers are not experts at the basic combat skills they need to survive on the battlefield.

Out of 95 soldiers who began Expert Soldier Badge, or ESB, testing here on Sunday, only three remain in the running to earn the Army's newest skill badge.

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