U.S. Air Force fighter pilots assigned to the 14th Fighter Squadron walk onto the flight line during RED FLAG-Alaska 17-2 June 16, 2017, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. (U.S. Air Force/Airman 1st Class Haley D. Phillips)

Editor's Note: This article by Oriana Pawlyk originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

For the fifth consecutive year, the Air Force has failed to completely close its pilot manning gap through retaining, and recruiting and training new pilots, recently released data shows.

The U.S. Air Force will fall short in its year-end production goal of reaching 1,480 pilots by the end of fiscal 2020, and missed its pilot production benchmark in fiscal 2019, too, according to statistics provided by the service.

The service will not achieve its 1,480-pilot target, first set in the fiscal 2020 budget request published last March. Officials anticipate the service will have roughly 1,300 pilots across all communities by year's end, which show steady improvement, spokeswoman Ann Stefanek said in a recent email.

The service could not provide a breakdown of types of pilot communities — such as mobility and fighter — still experiencing manning gaps.

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A pair of U.S. Air Force A-10 Thunderbolt II aircraft assigned to the 188th Fighter Wing, Ebbing Air National Guard Base, Fort Smith, Ark., fly in formation over Kansas, June 7, 2014. (U.S. Air Force/Senior Airman Sierra Dopfel)

Editor's Note: This article by Oriana Pawlyk originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

Despite multiple efforts to push the iconic A-10 Warthog's retirement date further into the future, the U.S. Air Force is now slated to shelve dozens of the Cold War-era ground-attack planes in the upcoming fiscal year, according to the service's budget request.

The Air Force will remove 44 Thunderbolt IIs from its total aircraft inventory, the fiscal 2021 Air Force budget documents say.

Their removal comes as the Air Force recently awarded a contract worth nearly $1 billion to Boeing Co. to produce new wings for the aircraft in need of the upgrade.

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Two U.S. Navy EA-18G Growlers fly over Afghanistan, Jan. 23, 2020. (U.S. Air Force/Staff Sgt. Matthew Lotz)

Editor's Note: This article by Oriana Pawlyk originally appeared onMilitary.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

The U.S. Navy just demonstrated that two EA-18G Growlers can be autonomously controlled by a manned fighter in a first-of-its-kind test for the specialized electronic warfare aircraft.

Boeing Co., the jet's manufacturer, announced Tuesday that the service recently flew two Growlers as drones while a third, piloted EA-18G aircraft acted as mission controller for the experiment.

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Editor's Note: This article by Oriana Pawlyk originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

New photorealistic renderings of the B-21 Long Range Strike Bomber have officially landed.

The Air Force together with the bomber's manufacturer, Northrop Grumman, published three new concepts of the next-generation bomber, showing the stealth aircraft in various hangars at bomber bases across the U.S.

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Air Force Gen. John E. Hyten appears at a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing on his nomination to be vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Washington, D.C., July 30, 2019. (DoD photo by Lisa Ferdinando)

Editor's Note: This article by Oriana Pawlyk originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

Faced with a lawsuit alleging he sexually assaulted a subordinate female officer, Air Force Gen. John Hyten, vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, strenuously maintains that he is innocent.

However, he said, the experience of being accused has made him more aware of the problem of military sexual assault — and now he wants to be part of the solution.

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The official Bible for the U.S. Space Force, which will be used to swear in all commanders of America's newest military branch, receives a blessing at the Washington National Cathedral, January 12, 2020 (Washington National Cathedral via Twitter)

Editor's Note: This article by Oriana Pawlyk originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

The U.S. Space Force has designated its own King James Bible for swearing-in ceremonies.

On Sunday, religious leaders at the Washington National Cathedral blessed the Bible for the Space Force, which was established as the sixth branch of the U.S. military in December.

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