Photo via Warner Brothers

The young, hefty, sweat-soaked gun runner slams the accelerator of the dilapidated jalopy and checks the sideview mirror. “Objects in mirror are closer than they appear,” it taunts, also displaying a cohort of Kalashnikov-armed Iraqi insurgents in the not-so-distant distance. Bullets whiz by his face, barely missing their intended targets. His partner is in the passenger seat, and shouts over the fire of AKs: “They’re gettin’ closer, come on man, go!” The truck is on empty, so the old Jordanian smuggler dangles perilously out of the side of the truck as he attempts a refuel. They’re losing speed, and the insurgents are gaining. Everyone panics. All seems lost.

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Senior Airman Mark Forester, an Air Force combat controller, was killed on Sep. 29, 2010 when he was leading a rescue team in the volatile Uruzgan province, Afghanistan, to rescue a fallen comrade.

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Roger Sundberg Photography

Six years ago, 31-year-old Swedish pilot Emelie Bonin was given the kind of devastating news that every human being dreads. She was told she had cervical cancer — a potentially fatal disease that stole the lives of nearly 270,000 women around the world in 2012. But last year, she received a diagnosis that all cancer patients and their loved ones desperately hope for: After a years-long fight, she was in remission.

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Screengrab via Netflix

Laws were looser back in the olden days of the U.S. military. If you were a soldier during the Civil War and you screwed up big time, you were looking at a truly painful consequence. It wasn’t uncommon to be flogged or tied up by the thumbs for your misdeeds back then — and it took our country nearly a century to realize that corporal punishment was probably bad for troops and morale. Here are 10 crazy punishments that used to be legal in the U.S. armed forces.  

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If you screw up your cashier duties at McDonald’s, chances are your boss won’t smoke you, unless he wants a harassment suit brought against him. In the military world, we live by a different set of rules and laws, one in which we forfeit many of our previously enjoyed rights and freedoms. The U.S. armed forces follow the Uniform Code of Military Justice, a set of legal conventions that was born from the 69 Articles of War in 1775. Although our current rendition of the UCMJ wasn’t signed into law until 1950 by President Harry S. Truman, it sure feels as though some of the punishments contained within its bindings date back to colonial times.

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VA courtesy photo

A quick and easy blood donation can help pave the way to better healthcare for veterans — and also provide answers to complex medical questions — through a new gene study program conducted by the Department of Veterans Affairs.

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