Air Force Academy football coach Troy Calhoun refused to answer questions about cocaine use by three of his players during a news conference Tuesday.

Calhoun is the Air Force's highest-paid employee, with a salary set at $725,000 per year plus generous bonuses in his 2013 contract, which has since been extended with accompanying pay raises.

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A threat-representative ICBM target launches from the Ronald Reagan Ballistic Missile Defense Test Site on Kwajalein Atoll in the Republic ofthe Marshall Islands March 25, 2019. (DoD photo)

A secretive war game that examines combat in space kicked off this week in Alabama.

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(U.S. Air Force photo)

The vice commandant of cadets at the Air Force Academy has been relieved from his post after a traffic stop led to a drunken-driving charge.

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An F-16 Fight Falcon is parked outside the U.S. Air Force Academy Chapel at Colorado Springs, Colorado, in the winter of 2015. (U.S. Air Force/Mike Kaplan)

An Air Force Academy sergeant will face an evidence hearing Friday on a string of charges including 10 counts of assault.

Staff Sgt. Mariano Jackson, assigned to the academy's 10th Surgical Operations Squadron, is accused of a series of assaults between 2016 and 2019, most of which involve a victim described as his "intimate partner."

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A Soldier holds an American flag prior to the start of an oath of citizenship ceremony in the General George Patton Museum's Abrams Auditorium at Fort Knox, Kentucky, Sept. 19, 2018. (U.S. Army/ Eric Pilgrim)

A five-year review of how the government deals with veterans with immigration issues shows that laws designed to give more protection to those who served in the military are spottily enforced.

The report from the Government Accountability Office found that veterans who never gained U.S. citizenship didn't consistently get consideration for their service in the face of possible deportation. The agency called on Immigration and Customs Enforcement to "ensure that veterans receive appropriate levels of review before they are placed in removal proceedings."

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An F-16 Fight Falcon is parked outside the U.S. Air Force Academy Chapel at Colorado Springs, Colorado, in the winter of 2015. (U.S. Air Force/Mike Kaplan)

Suspicious results on the final exams of some Air Force Academy underclassmen triggered a probe that kicked off Wednesday to determine whether the cadets cheated.

The investigations, called a "clarification" process in academy lingo, are used to determine whether cadets violated the school's honor code, which forbids lying, cheating and stealing.

"Academic integrity at the academy is taken extremely seriously," academy spokeswoman Lt. Col. Tracy Bunko said in an email.

"When a faculty member has any concerns about cheating or plagiarism, it is immediately flagged and they conduct sessions known as 'clarifications' with cadets to address the concerns openly and to determine if there is a reasonable explanation. If not, the case is forwarded to the honor system, which determines whether a violation occurred."

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