Update: Army Says Plans To Return Drill Sergeants To AIT Are Not Final

news
Army Reserve photo by Master Sgt. Michel Sauret

Despite what appeared to be an official announcement published on the official news site of the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, a spokesman for the command tells Task & Purpose that plans to return drill sergeants to Advanced Individual Training are, in fact, not final.   


On May 18, Task & Purpose published an article titled “It’s Official: Drill Sergeants Will Return To Soldiers’ AIT In 2019” which stated that the Army had, after years of deliberation, decided to replace AIT platoon sergeants with drill sergeants, and that the change could occur as soon as October 2019.

The article was reported based on an article published on TRADOC’s official news site that seemed to indicate that the plans had been finalized. The TRADOC story was titled “Drill sergeant’s return to AIT scheduled late 2019.”

The TRADOC article was posted to the command’s official Facebook page accompanied with the following text: “A decade after taking drill sergeants out of advanced individual training and replacing them with AIT platoon sergeants, the U.S. Army is planning on bringing the drill sergeants back.”

In an email to Task & Purpose, TRADOC media relations chief Maj. Thomas J. Campbell explained that the TRADOC news article was misleading, and that the headline has since been changed to more  accurately reflect the status of discussions within the command.

The new headline is “Talks underway for drill sergeants’ return to AIT >> TRADOC.”

“I understand your work is based on an article posted to the TRADOC News site on May 15 titled, ‘Drill sergeants’ return to AIT scheduled for late 2019,’  but please understand this was our office sharing news relevant to the Command. It is not a piece produced by TRADOC and certainly not an official announcement. We have also asked their editor to modify their headline.”

Task & Purpose has issued a correction in the May 18 article and changed the headline to reflect Campbell’s remarks. You can read the corrected version here.  

Marvel's The Punisher/Netflix

Frank Castle is hanging up his Punisher garb — for now.

Read More Show Less
U.S. Army General Jospeh Votel, head of Central Command, visits an airbase at an undisclosed location in northeast Syria, February 18, 2019. REUTERS/Phil Stewart

AIRBASE IN NORTHEAST SYRIA (Reuters) - The commander of U.S.-backed forces in Syria called on Monday for about 1,000 to 1,500 international forces to remain in Syria to help fight Islamic State and expressed hope that the United States, in particular, would halt plans for a total pullout.

Read More Show Less

The Navy is bulking up its fleet of autonomous robot vessels with the purchase of a cadre of four of Boeing's extremely large and incredibly grandiose unmanned Orca submarines.

Read More Show Less

Let's talk about love – and not the type of love that results in sailors getting an injection of antibiotics after a port call in Thailand. I'm talking about a deeper, spiritual kind of love: The Pentagon's passionate love affair with great power competition.

Nearly a decade ago, the Defense Department was betrothed to an idea called "counterinsurgency;" but the Pentagon ditched COIN at the altar after a Jody named Afghanistan ruined the romance. Now the U.S. military is head over heels in love with countering Russia and China – so much so that the Pentagon has named a cockroach "The Global War on Terrorism" after its ex so it could be fed to a Meerkat.

Read More Show Less
Homes at Fort Benning undergo lead paint removal as the U.S. Army mobilizes to protect residents against lead poisoning hazards in Fort Benning, Georgia, U.S., September 10, 2018. (Reuters/Andrea Januta)

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Deeply troubled by military housing conditions exposed by Reuters reporting, the U.S. Army's top leadership vowed on Friday to renegotiate its housing contracts with private real estate firms, test tens of thousands of homes for toxins and hold its own commanders responsible for protecting Army base residents from dangerous homes.

In an interview, the Secretary of the Army Mark Esper said Reuters reports and a chorus of concerns from military families had opened his eyes to the need for urgent overhauls of the Army's privatized housing system, which accommodates more than 86,000 families.

The secretary's conclusion: Private real estate firms tasked with managing and maintaining the housing stock have been failing the families they serve, and the Army itself neglected its duties.

Read More Show Less