US charges WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange with espionage

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Justice Department unveiled 17 new criminal charges against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange on Thursday, saying he unlawfully published the names of classified sources and conspired with and assisted ex-Army intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning in obtaining access to classified information.

The superseding indictment comes a little more than a month after the Justice Department unsealed a narrower criminal case against Assange.


Assange was initially charged with conspiring with Manning to gain access to a government computer as part of a 2010 leak by WikiLeaks of hundreds of thousands of U.S. military reports about the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.

Wikileaks describes itself as specializing in the publication of "censored or otherwise restricted official materials involving war, spying and corruption."

Assange is now fighting extradition to the United States, after Ecuador in April revoked his seven-year asylum in the country's London embassy. He was arrested that day, April 11, by British police as he left the embassy.

He is now serving a 50-week sentence in a London jail for skipping bail when he fled to the Ecuadorean embassy in 2012.

The decision to charge Assange with espionage crimes is notable, and unusual. Most cases involving the theft of classified information have targeted government employees, like Manning, and not the people who publish the information itself.

The Justice Department's quick turn-around with the filing of a more substantial indictment against Assangeis not surprising.

Under extradition rules, the United States had only a 60-day window from the date of Assange's arrest in London to add more charges. After that, foreign governments do not generally accept superseding charges.

SEE ALSO: Watch Julian Assange, Looking Like Bearded David Letterman, As He's Arrested Outside Ecuador's Embassy

(Reuters/Henry Nicholls)
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Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

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