How The US Military Invented The iPhone

Gear
Military families welcome soldiers assigned to 4th Brigade, 1st Armored Division returning from Iraq, Nov. 10, 2011, at Fort Bliss, Texas.
U.S. Army photo by Maj. Myles Caggins

For those anxiously awaiting the release of Apple’s iPhone 7, they might be interested to know that the software company isn’t entirely responsible for the underlying technology behind their newest smartphone. Or for that matter, the technology behind many of their products, from iPhones, to iPads, and iPods.


Many of the breakthroughs behind Apple's iconic suite of handheld smart devices are actually due to Department of Defense research, according to an article by Rana Foroohar in Time Magazine on the findings of economist Mariana Mazzucato.

In her 2013 book “The Entrepreneurial State,” Mazzucato lays out the different technological advancements made by DoD, and how these taxpayer-funded advancements helped Apple and other tech companies revolutionize the industry. Mazzucato argues that it’s the work of government and state funded researchers that led to many of our recent technological innovations, rather than those in the private sector who often receive credit.

Research by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, DARPA, led to breakthroughs in hard drives, microprocessors, and of course the internet. The Department of Defense also had a hand in researching touch screens and LCD displays, while other agencies like the Department of Energy helped create the lithium batteries which power all of our different smart devices.

In other words: Many of the things that make a smart phone, well ...  smart … were pioneered by military researchers.

Todd Rosenberg/AP

A West Point graduate received a waiver from the U.S. Army to sign with the Philadelphia Eagles on Friday, and play in the NFL while serving as an active-duty soldier.

The waiver for 2nd Lt. Brett Toth was first reported by ESPN's Adam Schefter, who said that Toth signed a three-year deal with the Eagles. Toth graduated from the U.S. Military Academy in 2018.

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Indiana National Guard

The Indiana National Guard soldier who was killed on Thursday in a training accident at Fort Hood has been identified as 29-year-old Staff Sgt. Andrew Michael St. John, of Greenwood, Indiana.

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QUETTA, Pakistan/KABUL (Reuters) - The brother of the leader of the Afghan Taliban was among at least four people killed in a bomb blast at a mosque in Pakistan on Friday, two Taliban sources told Reuters, an attack that could affect efforts to end the Afghan war.

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(U.S. Army/Pfc. Hubert D. Delany III)

An Indiana Army National Guard soldier died Thursday night during a training accident at Fort Hood.

According to a Fort Hood press release, the soldier's injuries came from "a tactical vehicle accident in the training area." The name of the soldier is being withheld until the family is notified.

The incident, which occurred at around 10 p.m., will be investigated by the Army Combat Readiness Center at Fort Rucker, Alabama, the release said.

Nearly 32% of active-duty military deaths between 2006 and 2018 have been the result of accidents, according to an analysis from the Congressional Research Service.

The Army has had a number of vehicular deaths this year. In June, one West Point cadet was killed and 21 others were injured when a tactical vehicle rolled during training. A vehicle rollover at Fort Irwin, California killed one soldier and injured three others that same month, and in May, a rollover killed one soldier and injured a dozen others at Fort Polk, La.

Two aircraft from the Navy's Blue Angels demonstration squadron touched mid-flight during a Wednesday practice at Naval Air Station Pensacola, the Pensacola News Journal first reported.

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