US Coalition Hints It Might Still Be In Contact With Russian Forces In Syria

news
A F-15E Strike Eagle disconnects from a KC-10 Extender after receiving fuel over Iraq Dec. 5, 2016.
U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Tyler Woodward

A spokesman for the military coalition against ISIS hinted today that the U.S. is still in touch with Russian forces operating in the same space, days after Russia cut off those communications amid rising tensions.


Col. Ryan Dillon, a spokesman for Operation Inherent Resolve, gave those clues in a livestreamed briefing June 23 after reporters pressed him about the status of the so-called “deconfliction line,” a communications link between the U.S. and Russian commands that could reduce the risk of a military incident between the world powers.

“If we know through the deconfliction line that there are going to be strikes and our forces are not in the area, that’s how we want things to be,” he said. “It remains open and we’re not going to discuss every detail.”

Tensions have run high since the U.S. helped stand up a coalition garrison at At Tanf near the Syria-Iraq border, a key supply corridor that the Iranian and Syrian governments seem intent on securing.

Related: The US Has No Long-Term Plan In Syria, And That’s Dangerous »

Pro-Syrian regime forces, which are supported by Russia, tried to repeatedly enter the deconfliction zone surrounding the base, triggering retaliatory U.S. strikes against Syrian drones, Task & Purpose reported earlier this week.

After a Navy F-18 shot down a Syrian SU-22 on June 18 for attacking U.S.-backed rebels, Russia declared that it was done coordinating its military’s moves in Syria with U.S. forces.

Earlier today, Russian Navy frigates launched six cruise missiles at Islamic State targets in Syria northeast of Homs, according to the U.S. News & World Report.

When asked by reporters whether the U.S. was notified ahead of the cruise missile strikes, Dillon said, “If they have missiles entering our airspace, that is why the deconfliction line exists. It is open and it is in use.”

He added, “As long as we can deconflict and focus on what we’re there to do without having any strategic mishaps … we’re perfectly happy with that.”

When asked about Syrian regime forces and Iranian-backed militias who, like the U.S.-led coalition, were advancing on Islamic State-held territory, Dillon responded: “We’re here to fight ISIS, and if others want to fight ISIS to defeat them, we have no problem with that.”

WATCH NEXT:

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider

If you're in the market for a bunker in the southwest, you're in luck. A decommissioned missile complex is now on sale outside of Tucson for nearly $400,000. The complex was home to an armed Titan II missile for 24 years, before it was decommissioned in the 1980s.

The structure is listed with Grant Hampton at Realty Executives. Now, the home is back on the market, and these photos show what lies underground in Arizona.

Read More Show Less

Connecting with the youths is all fun and games until Congress starts worrying you could accidentally expose the U.S. military to Chinese data collection, am I right?

Read More Show Less

A Florida Navy Reserve officer rescued a woman who was trapped in a sinking car, according to a report by CBS 47.

Read More Show Less

The Marine Corps will investigate whether another Marine has ties to a white supremacist group after he allegedly made racist comments on neo Nazi message boards that have since been taken down, according to a Marine Corps official.

Vice News reporters Tess Owen and Tim Hume first reported on Nov. 8 that at least three people who posted on the new defunct Iron March message boards were service members, but their story did not include any of the troops' names.

Newsweek reporters James LaPorta and Asher Stockler were able to independently confirm the identity of one of those service members as an active-duty Marine: Lance Corporal Liam J. Collins, an 0311 Rifleman assigned to 1st Battalion, 2nd Marines at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina.

Read More Show Less

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Donald Trump said on Tuesday the United States knows the location of the third in command to Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, who killed himself last month during a U.S.-led raid.

"We have our eye on his third," Trump said during the question-and-answer session following a speech at the Economic Club of New York. "His third has got a lot of problems because we know where he is too."

Read More Show Less