The DoD Just Dropped New Details On The Shootdown Of A Syrian Warplane By A US F/A-18E

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New details have emerged from the downing of a Russian-made Su-22 by a U.S. F/A-18E Super Hornet over Syria.


The Pentagon said that after Syrian jets had bombed U.S.-backed forces fighting ISIS in Syria and ground forces headed their way with artillery and armored vehicles, U.S. jets made a strafing run at the vehicles to stop their advance.

But then a Syrian Su-22 popped up laden with bombs.

"They saw the Su-22 approaching," Navy Capt. Jeff Davis,a Pentagon spokesman, told reporters Tuesday, as CNN notes. "It again had dirty wings; it was carrying ordnance. They did everything they could to try to warn it away. They did a head-butt maneuver, they launched flares, but ultimately the Su-22 went into a dive and it was observed dropping munitions and was subsequently shot down."

A U.S. F/A-18E off the USS George H.W. Bush in the Mediterranean then fired an AIM-9 Sidewinder missile at the Syrian jet, but the Su-22 had deployed flares causing the missile to miss. The US jet followed up with an AIM-120 medium-range air-to-air missile which struck its target, US officials told CNN.

The pilot ejected over ISIS territory, and Syrian forces declared him missing in action.

The focus of the U.S.'s airpower in recent years has turned to providing air support against insurgencies or forces that do not have fighter jets of their own. Before the Su-22, the US had not shot down a manned enemy aircraft since 1999.

Since the downing of the Syrian jet, Russia has threatened to target U.S. and U.S.-led coalition jets flying over Syria west of the Euphrates river.

Both Syria's Su-22 and the U.S.'s F/A-18E Super Hornet are updated versions of 1970s aircraft, but Russia and the U.S. both have much more advanced systems to bring to bear. Fortunately, an air war seems unlikely between major powers in Syria.

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