This Vet Missed Work When His Wife Went Into Labor, So His Company Fired Him

news
Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kaylee Dubois

Cainan Austin was the first baby born in Concord, New Hampshire, in 2017, but his arrival marked a bittersweet occasion for his dad. In order to be present for his son’s birth, Army veteran Lamar Austin had to call out of work at his new job.


Austin told the Concord Monitor that he was scheduled to work Dec. 30 and 31, but his employer, Manchester-based Salerno Protective Services, was less than understanding when his wife Lindsay spent those two days in labor.

He called out the first day, but on the second day, his supervisor responded with a warning.

“I didn’t want to make it seem like I’m trying to miss work or something,” Austin said. “The second day I told my boss, ‘My wife is still in labor,’ and he just said, ‘You’re forcing my hand, if you aren’t in work by 8 tomorrow we are going to terminate you.’ ”

Still, Austin refused to leave his wife.

As promised, at 1 a.m. on New Year’s Day, Austin said he got a text, reading, “As of now, you are terminated.”

“I just responded ‘ok,’ ” Austin told the Concord Monitor. “I was in the hospital, it was a long night, and I wasn’t trying to argue with nobody about a job while my wife was in labor.”

Austin served for more than three years in the Army spending a six months in Iraq as an ammunition specialist in 2006. He now lives in New Hampshire with his wife and four children. The job at Salerno Protective Services was new, and he was hired on a 90-day probationary basis. The company, however, expects its employees to be on-call 24/7. And because of the terms of his contract, his termination was perfectly legal.

“Maybe I just wasn’t working there long enough for them to want to keep me,” Austin said.

Prior to working there, he held jobs as a crossing guard, at Target, and Pitco, a company that makes oil fryers for fast food companies. And while he was unemployed, his church helped him and his family get back on the feet.

He hopes eventually to get into electrical work.

After reading Austin’s story, Denis Beaudoin, the business manager from the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers in Concord, reached out to Austin, offering him the chance to apply for an apprenticeship. Three other companies approached him as well, and a fundraiser pledged to help his family out financially.

“Sometimes you lose something and you get something even better,” Austin said.

Navy SEAL Lt. Jacob "Jake" Portier will be arraigned Tuesday in San Diego for allegedly failing to report war crimes committed by a fellow SEAL and other related offenses.

Read More Show Less

President Donald Trump hit back at House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Thursday with a letter saying he was "sorry to inform" her that her trip to Brussels, Belgium and Afghanistan would be canceled due to the government shutdown, just one day after Pelosi proposed cancelling the State of the Union address for similar reasons.

Read More Show Less
Marine Corps drill instructor R. Lee Ermey in his iconic role in 'Full Metal Jacket' (Warner Bros.)

Retired Marine Staff Sgt. R. Lee Ermey, the legendary Marine drill instructor turned iconic Full Metal Jacket actor who died last year, will be formally laid to rest with full military honors at Arlington National Cemetery at 10 a.m. on Jan. 18, according to the cemetery's web site.

Read More Show Less
John Wick Chapter 3: Parabellum/IMDB

John Wick doesn't give a fuck. He doesn't care about the rules of fancy hotels. He doesn't care about the odds, considering he's always outnumbered and always ends up the last man standing.

And he definitely doesn't give a damn about traffic laws, made apparent in the new trailer for John Wick Chapter 3: Parabellum.

Read More Show Less