Get out of the house with these free tickets to outdoor events for veterans and their families

Lifestyle

Spring has officially sprung and with that comes warmer weather.

It's time to break that cabin fever by soaking up mass quantities of vitamin B12 courtesy of that big heat tab in the sky. A great way to execute that mission is by attending hundreds of free events throughout the country courtesy of Veteran Tickets Foundation. Baseball season is in full "swing" and Vet Tix has plenty of tickets for MLB teams throughout the country. If baseball games aren't your bag, check out some of other exciting events they have tickets for.


Below is a sampling of the hundreds of events Vet Tix has free tickets to for Vet Tix members. Don't see anything in your area? We get new events daily so be sure to check your emails for new events.

April 21st- - Detroit, MI. - Detroit Tigers vs. Chicago White Sox

April 22nd – Denver, Co., Colorado Rockies vs. Washington Nationals

April 25th – Duluth, GA. – Disney on Ice – 100 Years of Magic

April 26th – Minneapolis, MN – Minnesota Twins vs. Baltimore Orioles

April 26th – Los Angeles, CA. – Combate 36, Mixed Martial Arts

May 1st – Phoenix, AZ. – Arizona Diamondbacks vs. New York Yankees

May 17th - Los Angeles, CA. – Eric Church, Double Down Tour

May 18th – Morrison, CO. – Napa Night of Fire & Thunder

To become a VetTixer and to request tickets to these and hundreds of other events, which are free except for a very small delivery fee, visit VetTix.org to create a free account. Once you've created an account and we've verified your status as military or a veteran, you can review hundreds of upcoming events across the country.

Steven Weintraub is Chief Strategy Officer of the Veteran Tickets Foundation (Vet Tix) and a Colonel in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve. Vet Tix is ranked as the 2018 Top-rated Nonprofit in the United States by GreatNonprofits. Follow Steven Weintraub on Twitter @weintraub_sd

This post is sponsored by Veterans Tickets Foundation.

(Courtesy photos)

Editor's Note: The following story highlights a veteran at Walgreens committed to including talented members of the military community in its workplace. Walgreens is a client of Hirepurpose, a Task & Purpose sister company. Learn more.

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The company has also created the national Helping Veterans with Education and Retail Opportunities (HERO) program so that veterans not only have a job but a path to leadership and future success.

Stephen Johnson, an Army veteran and Walgreens regional vice president, says that hiring veterans doesn't just benefit former military families; it helps Walgreens too.

"Our customers are from all of America, and we want our employees to reflect that," he said. "We accept Tricare and have many military patrons near military bases, so why not hire veterans? We want to feed the future leadership of Walgreens so employees can work their way up the leadership chain."

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What is known is something exploded on Aug. 8 at a naval weapons testing range near the village of Nyonoksa. The Russian government's official account of the accident has changed several times since then, but the country's weather agency recently confirmed that radiation levels jumped to 16 times greater than normal after the blast.

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