This Veteran-Owned Shoe Start-Up Puts Out One Comfortable Pair Of Sneakers

Gear

There's nothing more American than unnecessary tacticool gear marketed for your purchasing pleasure, but where plenty of companies talk the talk when it comes to melding functionality and style, veteran-owned and operated shoe start-up Woobies actually walks the walk — literally.


Founded in 2015 by Army Special Forces veteran Tony Aguiniga, Woobies bills itself as the first veteran-owned shoe company. Its signature sneakers come in two styles: low-tops and mid-tops, creatively labeled at 5.56 and 7.62 (because, well, military stuff). We opted for the latter in olive drab. With a textured canvas upper, metal eyelets, and a thick rubber sole, suffice it to say these sneakers' have good bones.

The 7.62 mid-top sneakers from WoobiesWoobies

But what separates the 7.62 from most other mid-top sneakers I've enjoyed (and I've enjoyed many!) is the ankle support. Plenty of mid-top and high-top sneakers don't offer a ton by way of actual ergonomic support; the classic Chuck Taylor All-Stars as the prime example. But the Woobies actually include what feels like additional padding and support which makes them ideal for extended urban adventures (bar crawls, essentially).

Beyond comfort, though, there's another element that makes Woobie shoes stand out: brotherly love. Aguiniga and Woobies work with the Green Beret Foundation to help smoothen the transition for operators when they leave service, a community element that separates vet-owned companies from other start-ups. And frankly, that's not a bad way to spend $59.99.

Check out the Woobies sneakers here and get 15% off with the code 'taskandpurpose'

Brad Howard/Task & Purpose
(U.S. Air Force/Airman 1st Class Alexandria Crawford)

A new survey of thousands of military families released on Wednesday paints a negative picture of privatized military housing, to say the least.

The Military Family Advisory Network surveyed 15,901 adults at 160 locations around the country who are either currently living in privatized military housing, or had lived in privatized housing within the last three years. One of the report's primary takeaways can be summarized in two lines: "Most responses, 93 percent, came from residents living in housing managed by six companies. None of them had average satisfaction rates at or above neutral."

Those six companies are Lincoln Military Housing, Balfour Beatty, Hunt, Lendlease/Winn, Corvias, and Michaels.

What's behind these responses? MFAN points to the "culture of resilience" found in the military community for why military families may be downplaying the severity of their situations, or putting up with subpar conditions.

"[Military] families will try to manage grim living conditions without complaint," MFAN says in its report. "The norm of managing through challenges, no matter their severity, is deeply established in military family life."

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The F-35 Joint Strike Program may be the most expensive weapons program in modern military history, but it looks as though the new border wall is giving the beleaguered aircraft a run for its money.

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(Associated Press/Austin American-Statesman/Jay Janner)

A Texas judge has ruled that a negligence lawsuit against the U.S. Air Force and the Department of Defense filed by victims of the Sutherland Springs church massacre in 2017 can go forward.

The suit meets the criteria to fall under the Federal Tort Claims Act, which allows people to seek damages in certain cases if they can prove the U.S. Government was negligent, The Dallas Morning News reported.

Under most circumstances the doctrine of sovereign immunity protects the government from lawsuits, but in this case U.S. District Judge Xavier Rodriguez held that failure of the U.S. Air Force and the Department of Defense to log shooter Devin Kelley's history of mental health problems and violent behavior in an FBI database made them potentially liable.

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Editor's Note: This article by Amy Bushatz originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

ABOARD THE USS THEODORE ROOSEVELT -- Loose lips sink ships, but do they reveal too much about the hugely anticipated "Top Gun" sequel, "Top Gun: Maverick," filmed onboard in February?

Not on this carrier, they don't. Although sailors here dropped a few hints about spotting movie stars around the ship as it was docked in San Diego for the film shoot, no cats — or Tomcats — were let out of the bag.

"I can't talk about that," said Capt. Carlos Sardiello, who commands the Roosevelt.

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(Reuters/Henry Nicholls)

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Justice Department unveiled 17 new criminal charges against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange on Thursday, saying he unlawfully published the names of classified sources and conspired with and assisted ex-Army intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning in obtaining access to classified information.

The superseding indictment comes a little more than a month after the Justice Department unsealed a narrower criminal case against Assange.

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