This Veteran-Owned Shoe Start-Up Puts Out One Comfortable Pair Of Sneakers

Gear
Brad Howard/Task & Purpose

There's nothing more American than unnecessary tacticool gear marketed for your purchasing pleasure, but where plenty of companies talk the talk when it comes to melding functionality and style, veteran-owned and operated shoe start-up Woobies actually walks the walk — literally.


Founded in 2015 by Army Special Forces veteran Tony Aguiniga, Woobies bills itself as the first veteran-owned shoe company. Its signature sneakers come in two styles: low-tops and mid-tops, creatively labeled at 5.56 and 7.62 (because, well, military stuff). We opted for the latter in olive drab. With a textured canvas upper, metal eyelets, and a thick rubber sole, suffice it to say these sneakers' have good bones.

The 7.62 mid-top sneakers from WoobiesWoobies

But what separates the 7.62 from most other mid-top sneakers I've enjoyed (and I've enjoyed many!) is the ankle support. Plenty of mid-top and high-top sneakers don't offer a ton by way of actual ergonomic support; the classic Chuck Taylor All-Stars as the prime example. But the Woobies actually include what feels like additional padding and support which makes them ideal for extended urban adventures (bar crawls, essentially).

Beyond comfort, though, there's another element that makes Woobie shoes stand out: brotherly love. Aguiniga and Woobies work with the Green Beret Foundation to help smoothen the transition for operators when they leave service, a community element that separates vet-owned companies from other start-ups. And frankly, that's not a bad way to spend $59.99.

Check out the Woobies sneakers here and get 15% off with the code 'taskandpurpose'

Casperassets.rbl.ms

Benjamin Franklin nailed it when he said, "Fatigue is the best pillow." True story, Benny. There's nothing like pushing your body so far past exhaustion that you'd willingly, even longingly, take a nap on a concrete slab.

Take $75 off a Casper Mattress and $150 off a Wave Mattress with code TASKANDPURPOSE

And no one knows that better than military service members and we have the pictures to prove it.

Read More Show Less
Veterans Day at the Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery, 11 November, 2018. Photo: Erich Backes/U.S. Army

In typical veteran community fashion, hundreds of people showed up to two separate funerals last week for veterans who otherwise would have been buried alone.

Read More Show Less
(U.S. Marine Corps/Lance Cpl. Darien J. Bjorndal)

KABUL (Reuters) - The Taliban killed more than 100 members of the Afghan security forces inside a military compound in central Maidan Wardak province on Monday, a senior defense official said.

Read More Show Less
Coast Guard cutter Bertholf on a counterdrug patrol in the eastern Pacific Ocean, March 11, 2018. (U.S. Coast Guard/Petty Officer 2nd Class Michael Trees

U.S. Coast Guard cutter Bertholf left California on January 20 for a months-long mission in the Pacific to support U.S. Indo-Pacific Command, the largest of the U.S. military's geographic combatant commands.

Coast Guardsmen aboard the Bertholf left Alameda on the 30th day of what is now the longest government shutdown in U.S. history. They left a few days after not getting their first paycheck since that shutdown started and without knowing when the next will come.

Read More Show Less
Plebes in the U.S. Naval Academy Class of 2015 march into Bancroft Hall following noon meal formation in Tecumseh Court. (U.S. Navy)

Leaking pipes. Moldering walls. Condemned offices and balconies. Plumbing that can't handle its load and a stormwater system dumping unfiltered rainwater into the Severn River.

These aren't the issues of a long-abandoned factory. They describe the current condition of the Naval Academy.

Read More Show Less