Afghanistan Veteran Receives World's First Total Penis And Scrotum Transplant

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Doctors at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine said a U.S. military sergeant has received the world's first total penis and scrotum transplant.


The man, who has not been identified, was injured in an IED blast in Afghanistan several years ago.

"We are hopeful that this transplant will help restore near-normal urinary and sexual functions for this young man," said W.P. Andrew Lee, M.D., professor and director of plastic and reconstructive surgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

The 14-hour surgery, conducted by a team of nine plastic surgeons and two urological surgeons on March 26, involved a transplant from a deceased donor of the entire penis, the scrotum without testicles and partial abdominal wall. The testicles, which could have contained sperm from a deceased donor, were not included in the transplant.

The Pentagon has focused on advancements in genital transplants to treat the scores of soldiers injured by IEDs in Iraq and Afghanistan.

In a statement, the recipient said his injury was "not an easy one to accept."

"When I first woke up, I felt finally more normal...with a level of confidence as well. Confidence... like finally I'm OK now," he said.

The patient is expected to be discharged from the hospital this week.

The procedure is the second penis transplant to be reported in the U.S., but the first full transplant of its kind.

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©2018 Alabama Media Group, Birmingham. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

U.S. Air Force/Tech. Sgt. Brian Kimball

Editor's Note: This article by Oriana Pawlyk originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

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