Here's What 10 Actual Veterans Say Is On Their EDC List

Humor
Screenshot/Google

"Everyday carry" is supposed to be just that: the stuff you always need, or wish you had, to tackle whatever life throws at you on a daily basis. Sure, loading up on EDC goodies can be about looking tacticool if you really want — a consumerist orgasm of virtue-signaling with "pieces of man-flair," as T&P; contributor Francis Horton put it in his recent coverage of sometime White House adviser and all-time military wannabe Sebastian Gorka's EDC-themed cry for help. But for the rest of us, practicality might actually be a primary concern.


Related: Here’s What It Looks Like When Your EDC List Is A Cry For Help »

If you wanna load down your pockets and go-bag with flashy gedunk that advertises your superior vigilance, knock yourself out. But some T&P; readers — you know, actual vets — read our Gorka sendup and felt compelled to share what's in their everyday carry. Get ready to compare notes:

1. The Regular Guy

Joe Plenzler, a Marine vet who works for the American Legion, is ready to do battle in any boardroom — in close quarters, if necessary, as evinced by the breath-improving gum. Also hat tip to him for inspiring the flood of photos we received.

2. The Recovering LT

Aaron Leong, a Naval Academy Marine, just can't quit the tac pouches and government-issue inkstick. We all have our little vices.

3. The Overachiever/Discount Hound

True to form for a company grade officer, the Iron Capt. balances his electronics with a moto ID holder to house his bennies and discount cards. He saves money on snacks by hitting up Costco for protein bars. Lest you think he doesn't rate all those corporate discounts, note the SmarTrip card marking him as a DC public transportation victim commuter. He's earned what he has through his suffering.

4. The Closet Rip-It Fan

I don't know if George Stankow's Army service led him to buy a wallet with a built-in phone charger. All I know is he carries the best challenge coin I've seen in some time.

5. The Serious Animal Lover

Doggy poo bag, doggy hard treats, doggy soft treats, cat treats (which, if you have a dog, you know are like candy to puppers). Not sure what this former Army officer has done or seen, but always being ready to win over a random doggo seems like a good everyday skill to me.

6. The Simple-Things Appreciator

The only way this Army officer could enjoy his morning latte more is if Starbucks put it in his Camelbak before a PT run.

7. The Quality Personal Products Haver

Some gunnies want the finer things in life, like high-quality earbuds, premium lip balm, and even a bespoke "Nationals" DC Metro card. Whatever it takes to keep a gunny from going all gunny on me on the train.

8. The Office Headache Haver

This former Marine never knows when she's going to need extra-strength Excedrin. Probably right after some d-bag on the train asks about her reading material, or a coworker tells her to "smile more."

9. The Mediocre Jedi

What, no rocket pack? No shackled Han Solo? Screw "mediocre Jedi": You're not much of a bounty hunter, even.

10. The Unreformed Grunt

My only issues with this setup are (1) not enough dip and (2) you should really use Coke bottles for your spit and piss, so you can never mix them up with that sweet sweet Mountain Dew.

Got more photos of real vets' EDC? Drop them in the comments below.

Pearl Harbor survivor Lauren Bruner attends the dual interment of fellow USS Arizona survivors John D. Anderson, boatswain's mate 2nd class, and Clarendon R. Hetrick, seaman 1st class, at the USS Arizona Memorial in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, as part of the 75th anniversary of the attacks on Pearl Harbor. (U.S. Navy/Petty Officer 2nd Class Somers Steelman)

Just before 8 a.m. on a Sunday morning 78 years ago, Lauren Bruner was preparing for church services and a date that would follow with a girl he'd met outside his Navy base.

The 21-year-old sailor was stationed as a fire controlman aboard the U.S. battleship USS Arizona, overseeing the vessel's .50-caliber guns.

Then alarms rang out. A Japanese plane had bombed the ship in a surprise attack.

It took only nine minutes for the Arizona to sink after the first bomb hit. Bruner was struck by gunfire while trying to flee the inferno that consumed the ship, the second-to-last man to escape the explosion that killed 1,177, including his best friend; 335 survived.

More than 70% of Bruner's body was burned. He was hospitalized for weeks.

Now, nearly eight decades after that fateful day, Bruner's ashes will be delivered to the sea that cradled his fallen comrades, stored in an urn inside the battleship's wreckage.

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