Behold! A Vintage Woobie Jacket From The Vietnam War

Lifestyle
Smithsonian Museum Of American History

Even back in ‘Nam, the beloved poncho liner was a favorite among troops — or at least among one.


To whoever made this: Thank you for your service.Smithsonian Museum Of American History

Yes, that’s a fine looking woobie jacket, from the sewn dragons, belligerence oozing from the text on the back, to the powder blue lining. It’s a shame we don’t know more about its history. What we do know is that the National Museum Of American History acquired the jacket this year, according to Miranda Summers Lowe, a curator with the Division of Armed Forces History at the Smithsonian.

Much like the origin of the term woobie, little is known about how this vintage tacticool jacket came to be, just that it exists and it’s amazing. However, we can speculate on a few things.

By my powers of deduction, I'm pretty sure whoever made or commissioned this jacket spent some time in Saigon...Smithsonian Museum Of American History

It was likely made, commissioned, or purchased by a service member who was deployed to Vietnam between 1971 and 1972, and if I were a betting man, I'd say Saigon — if for no other reason than that this text reads like a love letter from a grunt to the shit:

When I die I’ll go to heaven because I've spent my time in hell.

Saigon.

Vietnam.

Originally issued to U.S. Marines and soldiers in Vietnam as part of a set — a wet weather poncho for the rain, and a liner for the cold nights — it was the poncho liner "that would steal troops’ hearts," as Angry Staff Officer previously noted for Task & Purpose.

Related: Why The Woobie Is The Greatest Military Invention Ever Fielded »

Made from recycled parachute material, soft as all hell, durable, and camouflaged — so it’s tactical and comfy — it’s not a stretch to imagine some salty short timer deciding: “fuck this issued jacket, I’m going commando, the woobie way,” or something along those lines. After all, our phantom Saigon stylist isn’t the first to look at a woobie and speculate on how to improve upon perfection.

The definition of "tacticool."Smithsonian Museum Of American History

With the way tacticool garments and mil-spec civilian gear are flying off the shelves, it’s odd that clothing outlets continue to hawk the military’s most despised gear — from combat boot inspired kicks to glow belts. Yet we still haven’t seen the military’s most beloved issued item on the shelves at major civilian retailers. Can you say woobie hand towel? Woobie watch cap? Woobie winter coat? Woobie undies?

Oh no. What have I done?

WATCH NEXT:

Casperassets.rbl.ms

Benjamin Franklin nailed it when he said, "Fatigue is the best pillow." True story, Benny. There's nothing like pushing your body so far past exhaustion that you'd willingly, even longingly, take a nap on a concrete slab.

Take $75 off a Casper Mattress and $150 off a Wave Mattress with code TASKANDPURPOSE

And no one knows that better than military service members and we have the pictures to prove it.

Read More Show Less

A low-flying C-17 gave Nashville residents a fright on Friday when the aircraft made several unannounced passes over the city's bustling downtown.

Read More Show Less
George W. Bush/Instagram

This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

Former President George W. Bush is calling for an end to the partial government shutdown, which is about to hit the one-month mark and is currently the longest shutdown in US history.

In an appeal made on Instagram, the 43rd president called on "leaders on both sides to put politics aside, come together, and end this shutdown." The caption was posted with an image of him and former First Lady Laura Bush giving pizza to their Secret Service detail.

Read More Show Less
Staff Sgt. Daniel Christopher Evans was arrested on Jan. 29, 2018. (Photo courtesy of Wilmington Police Department, North Carolina.)

A special operations Marine is due in court on March 7 after being arrested last year for allegedly assaulting his girlfriend, Task & Purpose has learned.

Staff Sgt. Daniel Christopher Evans was arrested and charged with assault inflicting serious injury on July 29, 2018, according to Jennifer Dandron, a spokeswoman for police in Wilmington, North Carolina. Evans is currently assigned as a Critical Skills Operator with the 2nd Marine Raider Battalion at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, according to the Marine Corps Personnel Locator.

Read More Show Less
U.S. Army 1st Lt. Elyse Ping Medvigy conducts a call-for-fire during an artillery shoot south of Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan, Aug. 22, 2014. Medvigy, a fire support officer assigned to the 4th Infantry Division's Company D, 1st Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, is the first female company fire support officer to serve in an infantry brigade combat team supporting Operation Enduring Freedom. U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Whitney Houston (Photo by U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Whitney Houston)

Following Trump's inauguration, some supporters of ground combat integration assumed he would quickly move to reinstate a ban on women in jobs like the infantry. When this did not happen, advocates breathed a collective sigh of relief, and hundreds of qualified women charted a course in history by entering the newly opened occupational fields.

So earlier this week when the Wall Street Journal published an editorial against women in ground combat by conservative political commentator Heather Mac Donald, the inclination of many ground combat integration supporters was to dismiss it outright. But given Trump's proclivity to make knee jerk policy decisions in response to falling approval ratings and the court's tradition of deference to the military when it comes to policies affecting good order and discipline, it would be unwise to assume the 2016 lifting of the ban on women in ground combat is a done deal.

Read More Show Less