Watch Badass Actress Michelle Rodriguez Dominate This Gun Range

Entertainment

Michelle Rodriguez is a bonafide badass, and it’s not just because of the tough, take-no-shit characters she plays on screen. In a July 11 Facebook video posted to Taran Tactical Innovations, Rodriguez blasted through a tactical shooting course in seconds, before celebrating with a fist pump as she shouted: “Get some!”


The video of the 39-year-old Rodriguez, who stars in Hollywood blockbusters like Avatar and the Fast & Furious franchise, has already racked up 1.2 million views and more than 15,000 shares on Facebook.

Related: Watch Keanu Reeves Destroy This Gun Range »

Michelle Rodriguez takes on a mult-gun course at a Taran Tactical range in Simi Valley, California.Screenshot via Facebook

Rodriguez isn’t the only movie star to hit the firearm manufacturer’s shooting range in Simi Valley, California. On March 3, 2016, Taran Tactical posted a video of Keanu Reeves shredding with a pistol, shotgun and rifle, as part of his work-up for John Wick: Chapter 2. Even journalists have dropped by to test their hand at shooting, like that time two Buzzfeed reporters ran the course in March.

Last September, Rodriguez dominated the Taran Tactical range ahead of her work on The Fate of the Furious, and while it’s unclear if the recent video was also part of her prep work for the film, or just for kicks, it gives new meaning to the phrase “shoot like a girl.”

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