Watch This Compelling Proof That AK-47s Are Indestructible

Gear
Photo via Instagram

What does it take to actually destroy an AK-47? Perhaps the only weapon that can still fire after being jammed full of twinkies — I have no idea why that’s a thing — it’s close to indestructible. You don’t buy it? Check out this AK that was taken from a poacher in Africa.


Looking like a stage prop from “Mad Max: Fury Road,” this AK-47 is a patchwork of random chunks of wood, bits of string, and wire — with a liberal coating of rust, of course — yet it still fires.

Related: Will This Russian Handgun Become ‘The AK-47 of Pistols’? »

“The CEO of Underground Tactical sent me this pic of an AK-47 he pulled off some poachers in Africa. It still worked. Impressive,” notes Instagram user Jon Wayne Taylor, who posted the photo on March 24, 2016, and it was promptly covered online by Guns.com and The Firearms Blog. It’s begun making the rounds again, and it’s not surprising why. I mean shit, look at it:

Photo via Instagram

No dust cover? No problem! Ditto for the trigger guard, which is missing in action, along with the pistol grip and buttstock, which have been replaced with random pieces of wood and are held in there by… whatever.

Yes, the AK-47 is fucking indestructible. Meanwhile, you get a little bit of dust on an M4 and this happens:

U.S. Air Force officer passes in front of a MQ-9 Reaper drone, one of a squadron that has arrived to step up the fight against the Taliban, at the Kandahar air base, Afghanistan January 23, 2018. (Reuters/Omar Sobhani)

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A U.S. military MQ-9 drone was shot down in Yemen's Dhamar governate, southeast of the Houthi-controlled capital Sanaa, two U.S. officials told Reuters on Wednesday.

A Houthi military spokesman had earlier said that air defenses had brought down a U.S. drone.

The officials, speaking on the condition of anonymity, said the drone was shot down late on Tuesday.

Read More Show Less
Photo: U.S. Army Courtesy photo

Fort Hood's Air Assault School was renamed after Command Sgt. Maj. Basil L. Plumley on Thursday.

Read More Show Less
An E-2D Hawkeye assigned to the Bluetails of Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 121 lands on the flight deck aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). (U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Will Hardy)

Editor's Note: This article by Oriana Pawlyk originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

While attempting to land on the aircraft carrier Abraham Lincoln in the Arabian Sea earlier this month, an E-2D Hawkeye propeller aircraft struck two F/A-18 Super Hornet aircraft and sent debris flying into two other F/A-18s on the flight deck, according to the Naval Safety Center.

Read More Show Less

Nobody can be told what The Matrix is; you have to see it for yourself.

More than two decades after The Matrix showed the world what the future of the sci-fi action flick could look like, Warner Bros. Pictures plans on producing a fourth installment of the groundbreaking epic saga, Variety first reported on Tuesday.

Read More Show Less
Sailors from Coastal Riverine Squadron (CRS) 1 conduct category III qualifications on the M2A1 heavy machine gun at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif. CRS-1 is qualifying for future mobilization requirements. (U.S. Navy/Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Kenji Shiroma)

The Navy is considering giving Ma Deuce a quiet new update.

Read More Show Less