Gay and Lesbian Troops Perform For Charity In Japan [Video]

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Just three years ago, gay and lesbian troops could not serve openly, Saturday, gay service members aboard Kadena Air Force Base on the island of Okinawa in Japan took to the stage to perform and raise money for charity.


Six gay, straight, and lesbian troops performed to raise money for OutServe Okinawa, a military gay rights organization.

It's a great indication of progress just three years after the repeal of the military's controversial "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy, which has largely gone smoothly since its 2011 reversal.

Stars and Stripes wrote a report, and created a video of the performances:

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