The White House Is Reportedly Mad At Trump's Top Intel Chief For Daring To Tell The Truth

Code Red News
The Aspen Institute/YouTube

White House officials have been calling their friends at The Washington Post to let them know Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats "has gone rogue" over comments he made at the Aspen Security Forum on Thursday.


The leaks from Trump advisers come due to the "damaging optics" of what Coats' said in an hour-long conversation with NBC's Andrea Mitchell. Other aides said they worried the president would take what he said as a "personal betrayal."

Good Lord. What did this guy say? That Trump is a total moron? He's a kook that's unfit for office?

No, he didn't say anything like that. Coats just dared to tell the truth about Russia's interference in the 2016 presidential election.

Coats explained why he put out a statement attesting to the intelligence community's assessment of Russia's involvement (after Trump threw them under the bus while standing next to Russian President Vladimir Putin), and then looked surprised when he was told that Putin was coming to Washington in the fall — which he apparently hadn't been told about.

"I was just doing my job," Coats explained of his decision to release a statement that the intelligence community has "been clear in [its] assessments" of Russia's past and ongoing efforts to undermine U.S. democracy. He added that when he joined the administration, he met the president and told him that, as non-sycophants are wont to do, there would be times that he would bring news he didn't want to hear.

"On that basis, we started a good relationship," Coats said. "I just felt at this point and time that what we had assessed and re-assessed and re-assessed and carefully gone over still stands, and it was important to take that stand on behalf of the intelligence community and on behalf of the American people."

He added: "My thoughts there were that I needed to correct the record. This is the job I signed up for ... obviously, I wished he made a different statement, which I think now, he has clarified."

Other perceived slights from Coats included the news that he still hadn't been told what was said between Trump and Putin in their one-on-one meeting in Helsinki. Just to refresh your memory: On Tuesday, the President of the United States hung out for about two hours with the President of Russia, and made "verbal agreements" on a number of issues of which neither Coats or the Pentagon seems to have been given any guidance on.

But worst of all for Coats was his reaction to the news that Putin was coming to Washington while he was on stage: "Say that again. Did I hear you? Okayyy. That's going to be special."

Sure, he may have gone rogue. Or he may have just reacted as one does when they are kept in the dark on matters they need to know about.

U.S. Special Presidential Envoy for Hostage Affairs Robert C. O'Brien arrives to the district court, during the second day of ASAP Rocky's trial, in Stockholm, Sweden August 1, 2019. (Reuters/TT News Agency/Fredrik Persson)

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Donald Trump on Wednesday named U.S. hostage negotiator Robert O'Brien as his choice to replace John Bolton as his national security adviser, making him the fourth person to hold the post in the Trump administration.

Read More Show Less

Editor's Note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

QUANTICO MARINE CORPS BASE, Virginia -- Textron Systems is working with the Navy to turn a mine-sweeping unmanned surface vessel designed to work with Littoral Combat Ships into a mine-hunting craft armed with Hellfire missiles and a .50-caliber machine gun.

Textron displayed the proof-of-concept, surface-warfare mission package designed for the Common Unmanned Surface Vehicle (CUSV) at Modern Day Marine 2019.

"It's a huge capability," Wayne Prender, senior vice president for Applied Technologies and Advanced Programs at Textron Systems, told Military.com on Tuesday.

Read More Show Less
Joel Marrable (Laquna Ross via CNN)

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs put on leave an Atlanta-based administrator and reassigned the region's chief medical officer and seven other staff members while it investigates the treatment of a veteran under its care.

Joel Marrable's daughter discovered more than 100 ant bites on her father when she visited him in early September.

The daughter, Laquna Ross, told Channel 2 Action News: "His room had ants, the ceiling, the walls, the beds. They were everywhere. The staff member says to me, 'When we walked in here, we thought Mr. Marrable was dead. We thought he wasn't even alive, because the ants were all over him.'"

Read More Show Less
he amphibious assault ship USS Makin Island (LHD 8) returns to homeport at Naval Base San Diego on February 25, 2015. (U.S. Navy/ Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Corwin Colbert)

SAN DIEGO, Calif. — A former U.S. Navy sailor was sentenced to 20 years in prison Monday for having sexual contact with a 14-year-old Oceanside girl in 2017, federal prosecutors in San Diego said in a statement.

Read More Show Less

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Known for acting on impulse, President Donald Trump has adopted an uncharacteristically go-slow approach to whether to hold Iran responsible for attacks on Saudi oil facilities, showing little enthusiasm for confrontation as he seeks re-election next year.

After state-owned Saudi Aramco's plants were struck on Saturday, Trump didn't wait long to fire off a tweet that the United States was "locked and loaded" to respond, and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo blamed Iran.

But four days later, Trump has no timetable for action. Instead, he wants to wait and see the results of investigations into what happened and is sending Pompeo to consult counterparts in Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates this week.

Read More Show Less