Wingsuited Madman Risks His Life for Veterans Charity

Support
Screenshot from YouTube

A wingsuit is a remarkably simple invention that allows the wearer to soar through the air like a flying squirrel, arms and legs outstretched, floating on a pillowy cushion of his own sheer insanity. Of the many ways human beings have devised to get themselves killed, it’s one of the most awe-inspiring and effective. During 2016, the deadliest year ever for wingsuiters, there were more than 30 fatalities. That number is due mostly to the sport’s popularity. As former Navy fighter pilot and BASE jumping aficionado Richard Webb told National Geographic, “Right now, wingsuit BASE jumping is, globally, the hottest thing going for the impressionable, 18- to 35-year-old single-male demographic.”


No wonder, since it’s cool as fuck.  

Fraser Corsan is one of the most experienced wingsuiters in the world. According to the project’s website, the combined distance of his 1,300 jumps would get you from New York to Mumbai.

Now, in an effort to raise £1 million for the British veterans’ charity SSAFA, Corsan has set a big challenge for himself, breaking the records for highest altitude (37,265 feet), longest jump (9:06 minutes), furthest distance (19 miles) and fastest speed (234 mph) . . . in just two jumps. Check it out.

And here’s a nice compilation video of wingsuiters doing what they call “proximity flying” which is basically just flying absurdly close to trees, rocks and other hazards. Real dumb!

As New Scientist points out, in order to break the record for height, Corsan will have to leap from a plane flying higher than most commercial flights into air that’s less than 60 below. We wish him the best of luck. He’s batshit crazy but at least it’s for for a good cause.

You can donate to UK veterans on his behalf here.

Dustin A. Peters (Cape May County Sheriff's Office)

A former Marine arrested as he tried to enter the U.S. Coast Guard Training Center in Cape May with a modified AK-47 rifle, handgun, body armor and ammunition faces federal weapons charges, officials said Friday.

Read More
The United Launch Alliance's Delta IV rocket launches with a Wideband Global SATCOM WGS-10 satellite from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., Complex 37 on March 15, 2019. The satellite brings enhanced communication capability for command and control of U.S. military forces on the battlefield. (U.S. Air Force/Tech. Sgt. Andrew Satran)

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

The US military's newest service, the Space Force, is only about a month old, having been signed into law by President Donald Trump on December 20.

Read More
(Cecil Field POW/MIA Memorial, Inc./Facebook)

Military veterans from throughout Northeast Florida came together Saturday morning to honor comrades in arms who were prisoners of war or missing in action, and remember their sacrifice.

Read More
The remains of Army Staff Sgt. Ian McLaughlin arrived back to Fort Bragg a week after he was killed Jan. 11 by an improvised explosive device in Afghanistan. (U.S. Army)

After the plane landed, Pope Army Airfield was silent on Saturday.

A chaplain prayed and a family member sobbed.

Tarah McLaughlin's fingers traced her husband's flag-draped coffin before she pressed two fingers to her lips then pressed her fingers to the coffin.

The remains of Staff Sgt. Ian McLaughlin, 29, of Newport News, Virginia, arrived back to Fort Bragg a week after he was killed Jan. 11 by an improvised explosive device in Afghanistan.

Pfc. Miguel Angel Villalon, 21, of Joliet, Illinois, also was killed in the same incident.

Read More

The Space Force has a name tape now

popular

The U.S. Space Force has a name tape for uniforms now. Get excited people.

In a tweet from its official account, the Space Force said its uniform name tapes have "touched down in the Pentagon," sharing a photo of it on the chest of Gen. John W. Raymond, the newly-minted Chief of Space Operations for the new service branch nested in the Department of the Air Force.

Read More