Here Are The Worst Military Installations For Each Branch, According To You

Humor
A U.S. Marine, with 1st Battalion 9th Marine Regiment, sits at the door of a bunker, at Range 401, at Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms, California on July 25, 2013.
U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Matthew Allen

One thing holds true above all others in the military: You can choose your branch, but you can’t choose your duty station. Duty assignments are a crapshoot, and there’s nothing anyone can do about a losing dice-roll except complain. So we asked you, our readers, to list off the worst duty stations for your service, and you didn’t disappoint. While 1,300 readers responded on Facebook, one branch was conspicuously mum when it came to shitty bases. Any guesses on which one it was?


Related: The 10 Dumbest Ways You Injured Yourselves In The Military »

For everyone else — Marine Corps, Army, Navy, and even the Coast Guard — these were the worst bases to be stationed at:

Marine Corps Base Twentynine Palms, California.

Forget “29 Stumps”: How about Marine Corps Logistics Base Barstow, in the California desert?

Camp Lejeune, North Carolina.

Norfolk, Virginia.

Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri.

Fort F**king Stewart, Georgia.

Or you know, just “The Army.”

Coast Guard Air Station Kodiak, Alaska. Bears, dude.

This shouldn’t apply to the Air Force.

Case in point:

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