(U.S. Army/Mike Strasser)

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on ProPublica.

In patriotism-drenched promotions, press releases and tweets, TurboTax promotes special deals for military service members, promising to help them file their taxes online for free or at a discount.

Yet some service members who've filed by going to the TurboTax Military landing page told ProPublica they were charged as much as $150 — even though, under a deal with the government, service members making under $66,000 are supposed to be able to file on TurboTax for free.

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Editor's Note: The following story highlights a veteran at Associated Materials. Committed to including talented members of the military community in its workplace, Associated Materials Incorporated is a client of Hirepurpose, a Task & Purpose sister company. Learn more here.

Associated Materials, a residential and commercial siding and window manufacturer based in Ohio, employs people from a variety of backgrounds. The company gives them an opportunity to work hard and grow within the organization. For Tim Betsinger, Elizabeth Dennis, and Tanika Carroll, all military veterans with wide-ranging experience, Associated Materials has provided a work environment similar to the military and a company culture that feels more like family than work.

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U.S. Marine Corps Veterans salute during the 5th Marines Vietnam War Memorial unveiling ceremony in the Camp San Mateo Memorial Garden at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif., May 28, 2018. (U.S. Marine Corps/Lance Cpl. Rhita Daniel)

California's high cost of living makes it a difficult place for retired military service members to settle down, according to an annual report by financial services website WalletHub.

California — home to the largest number of active-duty troops in the nation — fares poorly in the survey when it comes to affordable housing, homelessness and the proportion of of businesses in the state that are owned by veterans.

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Andrew Loeb

Editor's Note: The following story highlights a veteran at FedEx Ground. Committed to including talented members of the military community in its workplace, FedEx Ground is a client of HirePurpose, a Task & Purpose sister company. Learn more here.

Throughout their military service, veterans gain unique skills that often do not relate to the civilian world. During his 20-plus years in the Army, Andrew Loeb grew as a soldier and built his military resume. When he was ready to enter the civilian world, he was unclear how his military experience would be received.

Luckily for Loeb, he found his way to FedEx Ground, where he is using his military background to support the company mission.

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Ronald Burke

Editor's Note: The following story highlights a veteran at Abbott. Committed to including talented members of the military community in its workplace, Abbott is a client of Hirepurpose, a Task & Purpose sister company. Learn more here.

Leaving military service is a daunting task. For Desert Storm veteran Ronald Burke, that was certainly the case. However, Burke managed to ease the process by finding a company that allowed him to continue his passion – helping others. That connection gave clarity and purpose to his transition from the Army to working for Abbott Laboratories.

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Sharon Arteaga, Claire Tillman, Bilita Shelton (Military Spouses at Enterprise Holdings)

Editor's Note: The following story highlights military spouses at Enterprise. Committed to including talented members of the military community in its workplace, Enterprise Holdings is a client of Hirepurpose, a Task & Purpose sister company. Learn more here.

One of the biggest challenges in joining your loved one at duty station after duty station is pursuing your own meaningful career. Any military spouse can tell you that. Often just as you're poised for promotion, duty calls. You may find yourself in a new part of the country (or the world) with meaningless credentials and no professional contacts.

"Throughout our different assignments, I witnessed other military spouses who would essentially have to restart every time they would get to a new duty station," says Bilita Shelton, whose husband was an Air Force intelligence analyst for 20 years. "I did not have to do that. I never took a step back. And I've had a very successful career as a result of it."

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