NO SLEEP
Paratroopers from the 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division, wait for an aircraft at Pope Army Air Airfield, to take them to a training rotation at the Joint Readiness Training Center in Fort Polk, La.
Paratroopers from the 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division, wait for an aircraft at Pope Army Air Airfield, to take them to a training rotation at the Joint Readiness Training Center in Fort Polk, La.
Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class Seth Laughter, 2BCT

Report: Insomnia Is A ‘Hidden Wound’ For US Troops

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Combat-related insomnia is taking a toll on U.S. veterans returning from Afghanistan and Iraq. A report from Van Winkle’s cited it as the most unnoticed, under-prevented, and untreated injury that service members face — a major problem when the best treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder is sleep.

According to a review produced by two doctors at the University of Pittsburgh, service members who suffer from insomnia while deployed are at greater risk of suffering from depression, developing PTSD, and even contemplating or committing suicide.

“If we don’t treat sleep disorders, we can’t treat PTSD. We have to attack them together,” said Dr. Vincent Mysliwiec, chief of pulmonary, critical care medicine and sleep medicine service at Madigan Healthcare System in Tacoma, Washington, at the 2015 SLEEP conference.

Get the full story at Van Winkle's.