Watch a Coastie give zero f*cks as he leaps aboard a moving narco sub and pounds on the hatch

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Here's what happens when the Coast Guard finds a drug-smuggling submarine

The Coast Guard tends to take more than its fair share of flak for not being as combat focused, aggressive, or militant as the other uniformed services.

Now, Coasties everywhere finally have a perfect response to such nonsense.


A recently published Defense Department video captures crew members from the Coast Guard Cutter Munro as they chase a "self-propelled semi-submersible suspected drug smuggling vessel" (or a narco sub, for short) through international waters in the Eastern Pacific Ocean on June 18.

As the dramatic video shows the crew of the Munro speed after the sub, one of the Coast Guardsmen can be heard yelling in Spanish and ordering the vessel to stop, before turning to his crewmen and saying "that's going to be hard to get on." When the vessel doesn't stop, one of the Coasties decides to literally leap from his moving boat onto the moving narco sub and starts banging on the hatch, as if to say:

"Knock knock, mother fuckers!"

Brass balls on this guy.(U.S. Coast Guard)

The clip, which appears to have been recorded via helmet cam, ends with the narco sub crew opening the hatch, and emerging with their hands in the air.

The footage is from just one of 14 similar drug interdictions that the Munro and two other Coast Guard cutters pulled off between May and July 2019 along the coasts of Mexico and Central and South America, according to a July 11 statement from the U.S. Coast Guard Pacific Area.

On July 11, the Munro and its crew will offload more than "39,000 pounds of cocaine and 933 pounds of marijuana worth a combined estimated $569 million," in San Diego, California, according to the press release. Vice President Mike Pence is expected to attend.

U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Munro crew interdicts suspected drug smuggling vessel (U.S. Coast Guard)

The Munro's efforts are part of a larger push to combat drug trafficking off the coasts of Central and South America, and involved partnerships between the Departments of Defense, Justice, Homeland Security and federal law enforcement agencies.

The actual boarding operations in the Eastern Pacific are spearheaded by the 11th Coast Guard District, which the Alameda, California-based Munro falls under.

Despite how badass this video may be, it's hard not to be worried about the Coast Guardsman aboard the submarine. After all, if he were to slip and fall into the water, how on earth would he stay afloat with those gigantic brass balls?

SEE ALSO: 'The Night Is Ours' — Inside The Elite World Of Coast Guard Ship-Boarding Teams

WATCH NEXT: A First-Person View Of A Coast Guard Drug Interdiction

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