(Associated Press photo)

WASHINGTON — Seth Moulton, a former combat Marine who's running for the Democratic presidential nomination, revealed he sought treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder as he proposed expanded mental health care for veterans and others.

Moulton, a Massachusetts congressman who was first elected in 2014, said in an interview with Politico that he first sought counseling in 2009, after serving in Iraq.

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A U.S. Soldier assigned to 2nd Battalion, 198th Armored Regiment, 155th Brigade Combat Team, Mississippi Army National Guard, takes a moment to rest during Decisive Action Rotation 17-07 at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, Calif., May 30, 2017. (U.S. Army photo)

(Reuters Health) - Voice analysis software can help detect post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in veterans based on their speech, a study suggests.

Doctors have long understood that people with psychiatric disorders may speak differently than individuals who do not have mental health problems, researchers note in Depression and Anxiety. While some previous research points to the potential for distinct speech patterns among people with PTSD, it's been unclear whether depression that often accompanies PTSD might explain the unique voice characteristics.

In the current study, voice analysis software detected which veterans had PTSD and which ones did not with 89 percent accuracy.

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The Carl Vinson VA Medical Center iin Dublin, Georgia

Two veterans killed themselves at separate Department of Veterans Affairs hospitals in Georgia over the weekend, refocusing attention on what the VA has called its "highest clinical priority."

The first death happened Friday in a parking lot at the Carl Vinson VA Medical Center in Dublin, according to U.S. Sen. Johnny Isakson's office. The second occurred Saturday outside the main entrance to the Atlanta VA Medical Center in Decatur on Clairmont Road. The VA declined to identify the victims or describe the circumstances of their deaths, citing privacy concerns.

An email the VA sent the Georgia Department of Veterans Service Monday about the Atlanta incident said VA clinical staff provided immediate aid to the male victim and called 911. The veteran was taken to Grady Memorial Hospital where he was pronounced dead.

"This incident remains under investigation and we are working with the local investigating authorities," the email continued. "The family has been contacted and offered support."

The victim in Atlanta was 68 years old and shot himself, according to a person familiar with the investigation who was not authorized to speak publicly about the matter.

More than 6,000 veterans killed themselves each year between 2008 and 2016. In 2016, 202 people died by suicide in Georgia. And between 2015 and 2016, the suicide rate per 100,000 people for veterans ages 18 to 34 increased from 40.4 to 45 nationwide, despite the VA's efforts to tackle the problem.

In 2013, the VA disclosed that two of its officials had retired, three had been reprimanded and others were facing unspecified "actions" after reports of rampant mismanagement and patient deaths at the VA hospital in Decatur. Federal inspectors issued scathing audits that linked mismanagement to the deaths of three veterans there.

In one case, a man who was trying to see a VA psychiatrist who was unavailable was told by hospital workers to take public transportation to an emergency room. He never did and died by suicide the next day. Another man died of an apparent drug overdose after providers failed to connect him with a psychiatrist. And a third patient died of an overdose of drugs given to him by another patient. The death of a fourth veteran, who killed himself in a hospital bathroom, later came to light.

In 2014, the Atlanta center drew attention again after the murder-suicide of Marine veteran Kisha Holmes. She killed her three children and then herself at the family's Cobb County apartment. VA officials knew she was in distress and had identified her as a suicide risk.

And in November, the Government Accountability Office released a report saying the Veterans Health Administration had spent only $57,000 of the $6.2 million budgeted for fiscal year 2018 for suicide prevention media outreach because of leadership turnover and reorganization within the agency.

"By not assigning key leadership responsibilities and clear lines of reporting, VHA's ability to oversee the suicide prevention media outreach activities was hindered and these outreach activities decreased," the report said.

The VA said Monday it was reviewing its policies and procedures to see if changes are needed, adding all of its facilities provide "same-day urgent primary and mental health care services." The agency also highlighted its Veterans Crisis Line at 1-800-273-8255 and www.veteranscrisisline.net

"Suicide prevention is VA's highest clinical priority," the VA said in a prepared statement. "We are working alongside dozens of partners, including [the Department of Defense], to deploy suicide prevention programming that supports all current and former service members — even those who do not come to VA for care."

Isakson, chairman of the Senate Veterans' Affairs Committee, released a statement Monday, saying he was in touch with the VA about its investigations of last weekend's suicides, calling them "tragedies that we hear about far too often."

"While we have taken a number of steps to address and prevent veteran suicide, this weekend's tragic deaths clearly indicate that we must do better," he said. "We will redouble our efforts on behalf of our veterans and their loved ones, including our efforts to reduce the stigma of seeking treatment for mental health issues."

Mike Roby, commissioner of the Georgia Department of Veterans Service, said he also is keeping in touch with the VA about what happened.

"I and my senior staff will stay in close contact with both medical directors and their staff as they work with the federal authorities through the investigations," he said by email. "Our field service officers located at both medical centers remain ready to assist and support veterans and their families."

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©2019 The Atlanta Journal-Constitution (Atlanta, Ga.). Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

SEE ALSO: The Suicide Contagion: How The Effort To Combat Veterans' Suicide May Be Making It Worse

The Trump administration is looking into offering grants to connect veterans who are not already getting care from the Department of Veterans Affairs with the outside support they need as part a new initiative to tackle veterans suicides, a senior administration official said on Tuesday.

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(Getty Images/Spencer Grant)

(Reuters Health) - Military service members who are at risk for suicide may be less likely to attempt to harm themselves when they receive supportive text messages, a U.S. study suggests.

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Photo: Stephen Baker/U.S. Army

The number of active-duty soldiers who took their own lives reached a five-year high in 2018, an Army spokesman confirmed to Task & Purpose on Thursday.

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