U.S. military snipers have to be able to make the hard shots, the seemingly impossible shots. They have to be able to push themselves and their weapons.

Staff Sgt. Hunter Bernius, a veteran Marine Corps scout sniper who runs an advanced urban sniper training course, walked INSIDER through his most technically difficult shot — he fired a bullet into a target roughly 2.3 kilometers (1.4 miles) away with a .50 caliber sniper rifle.

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Marines embarked aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Boxer recently sailed through the Strait of Hormuz with an armored vehicle strapped to the flight deck, ready to fight off drones and Iranian gunboats.

A light armored vehicle (LAV) belonging to the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit can be seen on the flight deck as an AH-1Z Viper lifts off in a recently-released Marine Corps photo, NPR's Phil Ewing first noted.

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Marine Corps F-35s recently carried out the first at-sea "hot reload" of ordnance, dropping 1,000-pound bombs in the Pacific in rapid succession, the service said in a statement.

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Last week, as FBI special agent Troy Sowers bid farewell to the bureau he'd spent more than two decades serving, he was surprised at his retirement ceremony by 22-year-old Marine Cpl. Stewart Rembert.

The two had met just once before in 1997, when Sowers rescued Rembert after he was kidnapped from the hospital just days after his birth.

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Nearly six months after Marines first got their hands on the Pentagon's next battlewagon, the Corps says its brand new tactical vehicle is ready for a fight.

The service's Joint Light Tactical Vehicle, has hit initial operational capacity, Marine Corps Systems Command announced on Monday, declaring the vehicle ready to deploy and "support missions of the naval expeditionary force-in-readiness" around the world.

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The 2016 Manual for Courts-Martial (U.S. Air Force/Senior Airman Van Syoc)

Editor's Note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

A new legal opinion from the Navy-Marine Corps Court of Criminal Appeals says court-martialing military retirees is unconstitutional — and the reason concerns the issue of retirement pay.

Chief Judge Navy Capt. James Crisfield delivered the opinion last week, joined by Senior Judges Navy Capt. Marcus Fulton and Marine Col. Jonathan Hitesman. The decision was made as a result of an appeal from retired Chief Petty Officer Stephen Begani, who was court-martialed after leaving the Navy on charges of attempted sexual abuse of a child.

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