On April 14, 2004, Marine Cpl. Jason Dunham saved the lives of his fellow Marines when he jumped on top of an enemy grenade and shielded them from the blast.

Dunham succumbed to his wounds eight days later, and later became the first Marine to receive the Medal of Honor since Vietnam. He was born on Nov. 10, 1981 — the Marine Corps Birthday. Today, he would have turned 38.

Born in Scio, New York, Dunham joined the Marine Corps in July 2000, where he was first assigned to guard the naval submarine base in Kings Bay, Ga. In 2003, he was transferred to the 29 Palms, California-based 3rd Battalion, 7th Marine regiment, and deployed to Iraq in 2004.

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Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

The National 9/11 Memorial and Museum's new exhibit, Revealed: The Hunt for Bin Laden, tells the decades-long story of the hunt for one of the world's most notorious terrorists.

Using artifacts from the raid on Osama bin Laden's compound in Pakistan in 2011, as well as from the CIA and FBI, the exhibit shows how the military and intelligence agencies finally found and eliminated the founder of al-Qaeda.

"This is the first time any of the objects from the bin Laden compound have ever been seen in public," Clifford Chanin, the executive vice president and deputy director for museum programs at the 9/11 Museum, told Insider, adding that the artifacts had just arrived from US intelligence agencies the previous week.

While the artifacts may seem like "humble objects" to some, Chanin said, "the backstory of each of these things is very, very special."

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Oh, the 1940s, the glory days of military training videos: Back when PME's were produced with a Hollywood director's panache, and a cast of leading men were brought in to break down fourth walls with a devilish wink and a nod to the camera before dispensing some sage advice, like how to crack a tank.

While not every pearl of wisdom from retro military training videos withstands the test of time — see the Navy's 1967 video: How To Succeed With Brunettes — a recently resurfaced clip from a 1943 training video starring Burgess Meredith of Rocky fame seems to stand up in a few parts, but not all (more on that later.)

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As a 1-AO conscientious objector, Collegedale, Illinois resident William Twombly served his country alongside caged guinea pigs in the Utah desert, where he and a dozen fellow non-combatant soldiers — with their own complement of guinea pigs — were exposed to Q fever as part of the U.S. Army's Operation Whitecoat.

Drafted in December 1954 and discharged in December of 1956, the then-21-year-old Twombly was among more than 2,300 conscientious objectors who participated in Operation Whitecoat between 1954 and 1973, many of them Seventh-day Adventists like Twombly.

His objections stemmed from his religious beliefs, but duty to his country mattered, too.

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Eugene Ely makes the first airplane takeoff from a warship in a Curtiss pusher airplane from the cruiser USS Birmingham at Hampton Roads, VA. (U.S. Navy via Smithsonian Institution)

Before electromagnetic catapults and "goddamned steam," the Navy launched a fixed-wing aircraft off of a warship with nothing but a dose of luck and a giant pair of balls.

Those balls belonged to Eugene Burton Ely, who on Nov. 14, 1910, successfully launched his Curtiss Pusher biplane from the deck of a U.S. Navy warship, the first such flight for a fixed-wing aircraft.

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A virtual Vietnam War memorial is nearing completion, and you can help.

The Vietnam Veteran Memorial Fund (VVMF) is searching for photos of five Columbus, Georgia, Vietnam War casualties.

The campaign, which can be viewed at vvmf.org/Wall-of-Faces, features a page dedicated to honoring and remembering every person whose name is inscribed on the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. As of Thursday, the campaign has matched 1,585 pictures with Georgia veterans, and only 23 names from the Peach State remain without a photo, according to VVMF Vice President of Programs and Communications Heidi Zimmerman.

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