The Navy plans to decide by late 2022 how to dispose of the world's first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier and likely will turn to the private sector for help, documents show.

The former USS Enterprise, now rusted and gutted, sits pier-side at Huntington Ingalls Newport News shipyard, where it was built and launched amid great fanfare more than 50 years ago.

It remains to be seen whether HII will be involved in disposal of the Big E. The Navy has scheduled a public meeting June 18 in Newport News to hear comments on different options as it develops an environmental impact statement.

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(Charles Fox/The Philadelphia Inquirer via Associated Press)

The remains of six Native American children who were buried over 100 years ago are being returned to their families as the Army continues its disinterment project at the Carlisle Barracks Post Cemetery, bringing the total number of children returned to their homes to 11.

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Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer named a future Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer, the DDG 132, in honor of Coast Guard Capt. Quentin Walsh, who was awarded the Navy Cross for his service during World War II.

It is the first time a U.S. Navy ship has been named after a member of the Coast Guard.

"Capt. Walsh was a hero whose efforts during World War II continue to inspire, and his leadership in securing the French port of Cherbourg had a profound effect on the success of the amphibious operations associated with Operation Overlord," Spencer said in a statement.

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(U.S. Army photo)

Editor's note: This story originally appeared in June 2017.

National Doughnut Day began in 1938 when the Chicago Salvation Army set out to honor a group of women known as "doughnut lassies."

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(U.S. Air Force via Wikimedia Commons)

It arrived overnight and disappeared just as fast.

That's how historians have described North Carolina's Laurinburg-Maxton air base, a hub for military training during World War II. The vast majority of the United States' glider pilots were trained there, including the forces who played an unsung role in the D-Day invasion 75 years ago.

About 500 glider planes were used in the invasion, and 312 of those were from the United States. Of this number, almost all of them trained at Laurinburg-Maxton, about 90 miles east of Charlotte, said Frank Blazich, lead curator of military history at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History.

But despite the important role gliders played in transporting men and equipment, the base's contributions have been largely forgotten.

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(Facebook)

The Philadelphia chapter of a leading Muslim civil rights group is urging the U.S. Army War College to reconsider an upcoming lecture by an Islamic history scholar over his "simplistic, inaccurate and often prejudicial view of the long history of Muslim-West relations," according to a letter obtained by Task & Purpose.

In a May 28 letter to USAWC Commandant Gen. John Kem and Provost Dr. James Breckenridge, three leaders of the Council on American-Islamic Relations — Philadelphia chapter urged the cancellation of an upcoming lecture by Raymond Ibrahim, a prolific scholar of Islamic history and currently a writing fellow at the Middle East Forum, a conservative think thank.

U.S. Army War College officials declined to comment to Task & Purpose.

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