The wreckage of a U.S. Air Force E-11A communications aircraft is seen after a crash in Deh Yak district of Ghazni province, Afghanistan. (Reuters photo)

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

The U.S. Navy's elite SEAL Team 6 recovered two bodies from the wreckage site where a U.S. Air Force E-11A aircraft crashed in Ghazni province, Afghanistan on Monday.

The bodies and a flight recorder were recovered during the mission, which was first noted by Connecting Vets radio and then reported by Newsweek. Sensitive military equipment from the plane was intentionally destroyed by the SEALs, according to Newsweek, and U.S. officials have not ruled out an airstrike if they deem that the aircraft's remains still pose a risk.

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The wreckage of a U.S. Air Force E-11A communications aircraft is seen after a crash in Deh Yak district of Ghazni province, Afghanistan January 27, 2020.(Reuters photo)

WASHINGTON/KABUL (Reuters) - The United States on Tuesday recovered the remains of individuals from a U.S. military aircraft that crashed in Afghanistan and was in the process of confirming their identities, U.S. and Afghan officials told Reuters on Tuesday.

On Monday, the U.S. military said an E-11A aircraft had crashed in the province of Ghazni, but disputed claims by the Taliban militant group that they brought it down.

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An image broadcast on Iran's state TV of actor Fredric Lehne, playing a character based on real CIA agent Michael D'Andrea, in the movie 'Zero Dark Thirty.' (Twitter/BBC Monitoring)

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

Iran's state TV broadcast a photo of an actor from Zero Dark Thirty to illustrate a claim that the CIA officer that inspired the character had been killed.

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A coalition airstrike destroys an ISIS-K fighting position during Afghan Commando offensive operations in Mohmand Valley, Nangarhar province on Feb. 4, 2018. (U.S. Army/Spc. Jacob Krone)

The U.S. military dropped more munitions on targets across Afghanistan in 2019 than during any other year stretching back to at least 2009, according to Air Force data.

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Members of the Afghan Air Force crew stand next to a helicopter at the military airport in Kabul December 18, 2014. (Reuters/Mohammad Ismail)

KABUL (Reuters) - Afghan forces used ground attacks and air strikes in multiple operations against the Taliban during the last 24 hours, killing 51 fighters in an escalation that signaled renewed deadlock in peace talks.

Afghanistan's Defense Ministry said on Sunday that government forces had conducted 13 ground offensives and 12 air strikes in nine provinces, adding that 51 "terrorists" had been killed, 13 wounded and six arrested.

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Soldiers from the 1-118th Field Artillery Regiment of the 48th Infantry Brigade Combat Team fire an M777 Howitzer during a fire mission in Southern Afghanistan, June 10th, 2019. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Jordan Trent)

Once again, the United States and the Taliban are apparently close to striking a peace deal. Such a peace agreement has been rumored to be in the works longer than the latest "Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure" sequel. (The difference is Keanu Reeves has fewer f**ks to give than U.S. Special Representative for Afghanistan Ambassador Zalmay Khalilzad.)

Both sides appeared to be close to reaching an agreement in September until the Taliban took credit for an attack that killed Army Sgt. 1st Class Elis A. Barreto Ortiz, of the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division. That prompted President Donald Trump to angrily cancel a planned summit with the Taliban that had been scheduled to take place at Camp David, Maryland, on Sept. 8.

Now Taliban spokesman Suhail Shaheen has told a Pakistani newspaper that he is "optimistic" that the Taliban could reach an agreement with U.S. negotiators by the end of January.

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