Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

The National 9/11 Memorial and Museum's new exhibit, Revealed: The Hunt for Bin Laden, tells the decades-long story of the hunt for one of the world's most notorious terrorists.

Using artifacts from the raid on Osama bin Laden's compound in Pakistan in 2011, as well as from the CIA and FBI, the exhibit shows how the military and intelligence agencies finally found and eliminated the founder of al-Qaeda.

"This is the first time any of the objects from the bin Laden compound have ever been seen in public," Clifford Chanin, the executive vice president and deputy director for museum programs at the 9/11 Museum, told Insider, adding that the artifacts had just arrived from US intelligence agencies the previous week.

While the artifacts may seem like "humble objects" to some, Chanin said, "the backstory of each of these things is very, very special."

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When Navy Lt. Cmdr. Michael "Mob" Tremel took on an air-support mission on June 18, 2017, he didn't realize that he'd end up shooting down a Syrian Sukhoi Su-22 fighter-bomber in the U.S. military's first air-to-air kill since 1999.

"The whole mission out there that day was to go defeat ISIS and annihilate ISIS," Tremel recalled of the incident during a September 2017 Tailhook Association symposium. "If at any point in time that day it had escalated, that would have been fine by us."

Tremel may carry the memory of that day with him everywhere, and now so will his aircraft: According to recent Pentagon photos, the F/A-18E Super Hornet from VFA-87 that Tremel flew into battle clearly carries a fresh victory marking — a scalp for one of the squadron's "Golden Warriors."

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Oh, the 1940s, the glory days of military training videos: Back when PME's were produced with a Hollywood director's panache, and a cast of leading men were brought in to break down fourth walls with a devilish wink and a nod to the camera before dispensing some sage advice, like how to crack a tank.

While not every pearl of wisdom from retro military training videos withstands the test of time — see the Navy's 1967 video: How To Succeed With Brunettes — a recently resurfaced clip from a 1943 training video starring Burgess Meredith of Rocky fame seems to stand up in a few parts, but not all (more on that later.)

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A replica of a U.S. aircraft carrier is exploded by the Iranian Revolutionary Guard's speedboats during large-scale naval drills near the entrance of the Persian Gulf in February 2015. The Millennium Challenge 2002 U.S. military exercise resulted in a similar outcome, but at the hands of a retired Marine general. (Tasnim News Agency via Associated Press)

Editor's Note: The following is an op-ed. The opinions expressed are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Task & Purpose.

Back in 2002, nestled in that year and a half when Afghanistan was in full swing yet Iraq was still a twinkle in Donald Rumsfeld's eye, the U.S. military held its most ambitious war game in recent memory.

Called Millennium Challenge 2002, the idea was simple: to develop and implement training and doctrine that could be changed quickly to utilize developing technology and adapt to varying enemy tactics. The Cold War tactics the U.S. military trained on for decades were out the window and a new war was on the horizon.

It was a total disaster.

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As a 1-AO conscientious objector, Collegedale, Illinois resident William Twombly served his country alongside caged guinea pigs in the Utah desert, where he and a dozen fellow non-combatant soldiers — with their own complement of guinea pigs — were exposed to Q fever as part of the U.S. Army's Operation Whitecoat.

Drafted in December 1954 and discharged in December of 1956, the then-21-year-old Twombly was among more than 2,300 conscientious objectors who participated in Operation Whitecoat between 1954 and 1973, many of them Seventh-day Adventists like Twombly.

His objections stemmed from his religious beliefs, but duty to his country mattered, too.

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Eugene Ely makes the first airplane takeoff from a warship in a Curtiss pusher airplane from the cruiser USS Birmingham at Hampton Roads, VA. (U.S. Navy via Smithsonian Institution)

Before electromagnetic catapults and "goddamned steam," the Navy launched a fixed-wing aircraft off of a warship with nothing but a dose of luck and a giant pair of balls.

Those balls belonged to Eugene Burton Ely, who on Nov. 14, 1910, successfully launched his Curtiss Pusher biplane from the deck of a U.S. Navy warship, the first such flight for a fixed-wing aircraft.

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