This Veterans Day, two post-9/11 veterans-turned congressmen introduced bipartisan legislation to have a memorial commemorating the Global War on Terrorism built on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.

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Beloved readers: Your friend and humble is taking a break from covering service members accused or convicted of war crimes. In the spirit of Veterans Day, I am focusing on some exceptional people who have worn the uniform.

Since the end of the draft in 1973, those who have served in the military made a choice to serve a greater good. And since fewer and fewer Americans are able to meet the military's physical, legal, and other requirements to join, veterans are by definition exceptional people.

Unlike many Americans who "almost joined the military" – or who have no appreciation of the sacrifices made by the heroes buried at Arlington National Cemetery – veterans understand the meaning of this Bible verse: "Then I heard the voice of the Lord saying, 'Whom shall I send? And who will go for us?' And I said, 'Here am I. Send me!'"

This Veterans Day, I am paying tribute to some of the veterans whom I've had the honor to know or cover over the years. They were outstanding people and my life has been richer because of them.

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BAGHDAD (Reuters) - A barrage of 17 rockets landed near a military base hosting U.S. forces in northern Iraq on Friday but caused no injuries or major material damage, an Iraqi military statement said.

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U.S. Army cavalrymen from 1st Platoon, Bulldog Troop, 1st Squadron, 91st Cavalry Regiment; walk by some of the qalat buildings of Charkh District while on their way into the village of Paspajak, Logar province, Afghanistan, June 20. (U.S. Army photo)

The majority of U.S. military veterans say America's most recent wars were not worth fighting, according to the results of a recent Pew Research Center survey published ahead of Veterans Day.

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Royal Netherlands Air Force F-16s participate in a NATO mission in Lithuanian airspace, April 25, 2017. (Associated Press/Mindaugas Kulbis)

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

A Dutch F-16 fighter pilot who bombed a civilian home in Iraq thought to be an ISIS car bomb factory said he has been grappling with causing the deaths of at least four civilians on September 20, 2015.

The pilot, who goes by the pseudonym "Stefan," recounted the events surrounding his bombing mission to two Netherlands-based journalists, Olof Van Joolen and Silvan Schoonhoven, in the De Telegraaf.

"I was the mission commander, I'd done all the planning," he said in De Telegraaf. "Everything until the debriefing was successful."

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On a Friday night in October, Patrick Zeigler lay in a tattoo shop in Daytona Beach. His shirt off and chest bare, he braced as the tattoo gun pierced his skin. He had mulled the design for several months — the date "5NOV09," surrounded by a circle of thirteen stars, one for every person killed in the massacre 10 years ago at Fort Hood.

Zeigler timed the appointment just so, to give the tattoo enough time to heal before the 10th anniversary of the shooting Tuesday, Nov. 5. He asked that one of the stars be made gold, in honor of all the other lives that were torn apart that day, among them, his own.

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