Arturo Benavides (Courtesy photo)

Patricia Benavides, whose husband, Arturo, was killed in the Aug. 3 mass shooting in El Paso, Texas, is joining a lawsuit against Walmart with other families who lost loved ones.

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How We Found Out explores recent reporting from Task & Purpose, answering questions about how we sourced our stories, what challenges we faced, and offers a behind-the-scenes look at how we cover issues impacting the military and veterans community.

Last week Task & Purpose published a story about a lawsuit alleging that America's largest military shipbuilder misled the government and falsified tests and certifications on stealth coatings of its submarines "that put American lives at risk." The story quickly made the rounds online. Within a week, major outlets had picked it up.

Given the attention the story has gained, Task & Purpose's deputy editor, Jared Keller, spoke with senior reporter, James Clark, to ask how he found out about the allegations, how the story was sourced, and why he spoke to the people he did.

This is the first installment in the recurring column How We Found Out.

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CONCORD -- A former University of New Hampshire professor is suing several university administrators, along with the institution, for not renewing his contract allegedly due to his veteran status last year.

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America's largest military shipbuilding company has been accused of falsifying tests and certifications on stealth coatings of its submarines "that put American lives at risk," according to a complaint filed in federal court last month.

Huntington Ingalls Industries, which spun-off from Northrop Grumman in 2011, "knowingly and/or recklessly" filed falsified records with the Navy claiming it had correctly applied a coating, called a Special Hull Treatment, to Virginia-class attack submarines which would allow the vessels to elude enemy sonar, the Sept. 26 complaint alleges.

Instead, the complaint said, Huntington Ingalls' Newport News Shipbuilding facility in Virginia took shortcuts that allegedly "plagued" the class of submarines with problems, and then retaliated against the employee who spoke up about the issues.

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Retired Brig. Gen. Charles E. "Chuck" Yeager prepares to board an F-15D Eagle from the 65th Aggressor Squadron Oct. 14, 2012, at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. In a jet piloted by Capt. David Vincent, 65th AGRS pilot, Yeager is commemorating the 65th anniversary of his historic breaking of the sound barrier flight (U.S. Air Force/Master Sgt. Jason Edwards)

(Reuters) - Chuck Yeager, the retired U.S. Air Force pilot who broke the sound barrier, has sued Airbus SE, accusing the aerospace company of using his name and likeness without permission to promote a new high-speed helicopter.

In a complaint filed on Wednesday that refers to him as "one of the most, if not the most, famous pilots of all time," the 96-year-old Yeager objected to a June 2017 piece on Airbus' website about making the Airbus Racer a fast and cost-effective way to fly.

The piece quoted Guillaume Faury, now Airbus' chief executive officer and at the time Airbus Helicopters' CEO, as saying: "Seventy years ago, Chuck Yeager broke the sound barrier," and Airbus was now "trying to break the cost barrier. It cannot be 'speed at any cost.'"

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William Jennings Bryan Dorn Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Columbia, South Carolina (Facebook)

A Navy veteran who sued Dorn Veterans Hospital for allegedly failing to diagnose and promptly treat him when he came to the hospital sick has gotten $150,000 in a settlement of his medical malpractice lawsuit.

"I didn't expect any money out of this," said Eric Walker, 49, of Camden, the Navy veteran. "It was mainly about what can we do to make the VA better. What can we do to keep this from happening again?"

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