Army Sgt. Michael Zamora uses a prototype Third Arm exoskeleton to easily aim an 18-pound M249 light machine gun during testing at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, March 14, 2018.(U.S. Army/Conrad Johnson)

Earlier this week, I reported that U.S. Special Operations Command was working on an articulated, gyrostabilized "third arm" to help enhance operator's accuracy downrange.

Naturally, Task & Purpose readers responded with a barrage of dick jokes.

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Little girls everywhere will soon have the chance to play with a set of classic little green Army soldiers that actually reflect the presence of women in the armed forces.

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"Sir, you failed to use your turn signal... And you're driving a goddamn tank." (Webster Groves Missouri Police Department/Facebook)

Oh, the day after Veterans Day, when your news feed is spilling over with thoughtful op-eds and reflective essays on the costs of war, life after service, and ruminations on whether or not it was worth it.

It's important stuff, absolutely, but I'll admit that I caught myself thinking: You know, today I could really use some silly news. And behold, the internet giveth:

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Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

Creating a realistic battle scene — whether it's from World War II or the Napoleonic Wars — demands technical know-how and precise attention to detail.

Paul Biddiss, the military technical adviser on the upcoming World War I movie 1917, taught the actors everything they needed to know, from proper foot care to how to hold a weapon, "which allows the actor to concentrate on his primary task. Acting!" Biddis told Insider.

Biddiss has worked on projects from a variety of time periods — "large Napoleonic battles through to World War I, World War II, right up to modern-day battles with Special Forces," Biddiss said.

Read on to learn about how Biddiss prepared 1917 performers for the gruesome, grueling warfare of World War I.

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(Photo courtesy of the author)

Editor's note: This story originally appeared in November 2016.

American traditions have changed over time, including how we celebrate holidays. In the modern world, one new tradition is posting old photos to social media. This time of year, that means a deluge of military photos showing up just before Veterans Day. These photos can serve the important purpose of helping our friends understand who has served. But let's be honest: There are some we see over and over and over again. Here are nine profile pictures in your Facebook newsfeed right now.

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