The U.S. Navy Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62) returns to Fleet Activities Yokosuka following a collision with a merchant vessel while operating southwest of Yokosuka, Japan, June 17, 2017 (U.S. Navy photo)

Editor's Note: The following is an op-ed. The opinions expressed are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Task & Purpose.

Shortly after seven sailors died aboard USS Fitzgerald when she collided with a merchant ship off Japan in 2017, I wrote that the Fitzgerald's watch team could have been mine. My ship had once had a close call with me on watch, and I had attempted to explain how such a thing could happen. "Operating ships at sea is hard, and dangerous. Stand enough watches, and you'll have close calls," I wrote at the time. "When the Fitzgerald's investigation comes out, I, for one, will likely be forgiving."

The investigations, both public and private, are out, and the Government Accountability Office (GAO) recently released a report assessing the changes to training implemented since the collisions.

So, am I forgiving? Yes — for some.

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The Air Force has identified the two airmen killed in a training accident on Thursday as Lt. Col John "Matt" Kincade, 47, and 2nd Lt. Travis B. Wilkie, 23.

Kincade and Wilkie were killed at Vance Air Force Base in Oklahoma during a training mission involving T-38C Talon aircraft, the Air Force said. Two T-38s were training in formation when the incident occurred during the landing phase, according to a press release.

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Spc. Jacob Rosser, with the 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, plots his next point during a land navigation portion of 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry Division's Expert Infantry and Expert Soldier Badge testing at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Oct. 27, 2019. (U.S. Army/ Spc. John Weaver)

Editor's Note: This article by Matthew Cox originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS, Virginia -- The Army's newest soldier skill test is proving to be a sobering reminder that many soldiers are not experts at the basic combat skills they need to survive on the battlefield.

Out of 95 soldiers who began Expert Soldier Badge, or ESB, testing here on Sunday, only three remain in the running to earn the Army's newest skill badge.

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The U.S. Navy Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62) returns to Fleet Activities Yokosuka following a collision with a merchant vessel while operating southwest of Yokosuka, Japan, June 17, 2017 (U.S. Navy photo)

Two years after a pair of deadly collisions involving Navy ships killed 17 sailors and caused hundreds of millions of dollars of damage, the Navy still can't figure out whether its plan to improve ship-driving training has been effective.

In fact, according to senior Navy officials quoted in a recent Government Accountability Office report on Navy ship-driving, it could take nearly 16 years or more to know if the planned changes will actually have an impact.

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Um ... what? (Twitter/Virginia Jones)

Editor's Note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

Marines are known to take to social media to make fun of some aspects of life in the Corps, but in one recent case, it's affecting change.

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A Marine prepares to conduct an external lift during Mountain Exercise (MTX) 4-19 at Marine Corps Mountain Warfare Training Center Bridgeport, California, on Aug. 5, 2019 (U.S. Marine Corps/Sgt. Maximiliano Rosas)

A 21-year-old Marine died Sunday, Oct. 20, while training at the Marine Corps Mountain Warfare Center in Bridgeport, California, Marine Corps officials said.

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