Colt, one of the nation's largest and best-known gunmakers, will stop producing AR-15s for the civilian market, the company said this week.

Read More Show Less
AP Photo/John Locher

Editor's Note: This article by James Barber originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

Our list of essential gear for Area 51 raiders inspired a lot of discussion and commentary from Military.com readers and we've picked out a few of the best ideas and compiled them here.

A Facebook group called Storm Area 51, They Can't Stop All of Us has announced a plan to confront the Air Force on Friday, Sept. 20 and reveal just what the military is hiding in those secret labs out in the Nevada desert.

Read More Show Less

President Donald Trump presented former Army Staff Sgt. David Bellavia with the Medal of Honor in a White House ceremony on Tuesday, making him the first living Iraq War veteran to receive the nation's highest valor award.

Bellavia was awarded the Medal of Honor in recognition of his heroic actions of Nov. 10, 2004, when he killed five enemy fighters during a chaotic battle inside an enemy-held house during the second battle of Fallujah, rescuing an entire squad in the process.

But according to Bellavia, he likely wouldn't have made it out alive had it not been for his knife.

Read More Show Less
(U.S. Marine Corps/Lance Cpl. Robert Alejandre)

Just two years after the Marine Corps dropped $51 million to issue every single grunt a new lightweight combat helmet, the service is eyeing yet another newer, lighter combat helmet.

Read More Show Less

Once again, social media is fascinated with the type of weapon the top U.S. commander in Afghanistan uses.

This time, the attention is on Army Gen. Scott Miller's sidearm. On May 28, Afghan media tweeted pictures of Miller meeting with Afghan officials while holstering a .45 caliber M1911A1 pistol — which the Army no longer issues to soldiers.

Read More Show Less
(Courtesy of Heritage Auctions via Reuters)

LOS ANGELES, (Reuters) - A battle-scarred American flag believed to be the first planted on Omaha beach during the 1944 D-Day landings is expected to fetch more than $55,000 at auction next week, Heritage Auctions said on Monday.

The flag, with a distinctive gold fringe and a repair from an apparent bullet hole, was planted by a U.S. army engineer on Omaha Beach, the scene of some of the bloodiest battles when Allied forces stormed the Normandy coast of France in World War II.

Read More Show Less
© 2018 Hirepurpose. All rights reserved. Registration on or use of this site constitutes acceptance of our Terms of Service.