Monte L. Gould (Courtesy photo via Army Times)

If you're heading to basic training at Fort Jackson in June, you may run into a slightly older soldier.

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A still from the Army's 'What's Your Warrior' campaign (U.S. Army)

The Army is looking for media-savvy soldiers to help push out its revitalized brand with the creation of a new job field: marketing officer.

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Brie Larson and the U.S. Air Force Academy (U.S. Air Force/Marvel Studios)

Editor's Note: This article by Oriana Pawlyk originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

When the Brie Larsen blockbuster Captain Marvel rolled out earlier this year, the Air Force launched an all-out recruiting effort, hoping to capitalize on the story of female fighter pilot-turned superhero Carol Danvers.

The Air Force placed pre-show ads in more than 3,600 theaters nationwide, bought space at geek hubs such as Fandom.com, and hosted its own press events with Larsen, as well as a red-carpet screening in Washington, D.C.

From at least one perspective, the Air Force effort to hitch its wagon to Captain Marvel's star was an unreserved success.

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Army recruiters host a swearing-in ceremony in Little Rock, Arkansas. (U.S. Army/Amber Osei)

New Army recruits will take a personality test to see if certain traits they have could make them a good fit for military occupational specialties they may not have been originally eligible for because of low qualification test scores.

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Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

Last year, the British Army made headlines when it said it wanted "snowflakes" in its ranks. This year, it's calling on social media addicts, binge-drinkers, and anyone else who spends their time desperately searching for a confidence boost, no matter how short-lived it may be.

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Combat engineers are very yin and yang, always building this then destroying that, responsible for creating building bases, bridges and roads and destroying enemy land mines, barricades and fortifications. Sappers, as they're often called, are basically construction workers with guns, ready to pick up a shovel or a rifle at any moment.

U.S. Army combat engineers have played a pivotal role in every war of the last century, and that role that has changed drastically with each new conflict. During the Korean War, sappers they were instrumental in slowing down the North Korean advance in the early days of the war by destroying bridges. The "tunnel rats" of Vietnam were tasked with clearing the infamously complex tunnel systems that the enemy used for transporting troops and equipment, facing hand grenades, traps and the constant threat of a cave-in.

During the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, combat engineers took on a new role: helping rebuild the infrastructure, including schools and hospitals, and filling the gaps of the understaffed EOD teams. Engineers are often given the role of route clearance, which is critically important given the enemy's fondness for land mines and IEDs.

Watch the video above to learn about the unique role combat engineers have played throughout every major war — and find out exactly where the term 'sapper' comes from in the first place.


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