Mattis: No Indication Trump Wants To Withdraw From Afghanistan

Bullet Points
Army photo / Capt. Brian Harris.

Although President Donald Trump has made clear that he wants U.S. troops to leave Syria as soon as possible, Defense Secretary James Mattis said on Monday that the president has not indicated he wants to withdraw from Afghanistan.


  • “We’re there to do a job. We’re not there to stay forever,” Mattis told reporters Monday at the Pentagon. “The job comes first. As a matter of fact, we have a number of nations adding forces as we speak. The missions are on track.”
  • ISIS has carried out suicide bombings in Kabul that have killed nearly 100 people within a week. A U.S. service member was killed Monday in Eastern Afghanistan and another service member wounded during combat.
  • When asked if ISIS’ attacks in Kabul show that the terrorist group has the initiative, Mattis said emphatically: “No. They set off a bomb among innocent people.”
  • The Taliban delayed announcing the start of their spring offensive until April 25 because they were “taken aback” by the U.S. commitment to stay in Afghanistan and Afghan President Ashraf Ghani’s offer for peace talks, Mattis said.
  • “We anticipated that they would do their best to try to bring bombs right into Kabul,” he said. “This is the normal stuff by people who cannot win at the ballot box, so they turn to bombs. This should be completely expected. It’s what they do.”

WATCH NEXT:

This post is part of BULLET POINTS, our running SITREP of the military stories you need to read now. Sign up for more updates in your inbox here.

Veterans are pushing back against a Wall Street Journal op-ed, in which a woman with no military experience argued that women do not belong in combat units.

Read More Show Less

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump was reeling from sharp rebukes at home and abroad over his surprise announcement last month to immediately pull American troops out of Syria when he flew into the al Asad airbase in neighboring Iraq the day after Christmas.

Inside a canvas Quonset hut, one of the arced prefabricated structures used by the military and surrounded by concertina wire, Trump received operational briefs from U.S. commanders suggesting a territorial victory against Islamic State was within sight, but the military needed just a bit more time, U.S. officials said.

Read More Show Less
Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Lisa Ferdinando

The Coast Guard's top officer is telling his subordinates to "stay the course" after they missed their regularly scheduled paycheck amid the longest government shutdown in U.S. history.

In a message to the force sent Tuesday, Adm. Karl L. Schultz said both he and the Department of Homeland Security Secretary remain "fully engaged" on the missing pay issue, which have caused "anxiety and uncertainty" for Coasties and their families.

Read More Show Less

After years of frequent mechanical failures ad embarrassing cost overruns, the Navy finally plans on deploying three hulls from its much-derided Littoral Combat Ship fleet by this fall after a protracted absence from the high seas, the U.S. Naval Institute reports.

Read More Show Less