Bill To Close Loophole Used By For-Profit Colleges Targeting Vets Back On The Table

An article published in the Atlantic looks at how some for-profit colleges target veterans and their families in order to … Continued

Bill To Close Loophole Used By For-Profit Colleges Targeting Vets Back On The Table

An article published in the Atlantic looks at how some for-profit colleges target veterans and their families in order to take advantage of an education benefits loophole. For-profit schools are prohibited from receiving more than 90% of their tuition from government aid, but this does not include funds from military students, which has led some for-profit schools to disproportionately target veterans who have access to Post-9/11 G.I. Bill benefits.

“There are too many for-profits that are more interested in getting the dollars, picking up the revenue … adding to their bottom line,” said Delaware Sen. Tom Carper, a sponsor of the Military and Veterans Education Protection Act, a bill aimed at closing the loophole. The bill has been introduced a number of times since 2012, but as of yet, has never gotten a vote.

Senate research shows that in the past five years, 40% of post 9/11 G.I Bill tuition benefits have gone to the private sector. As opinion toward for-profit schools begins to shift, this could mean the bill, which was reintroduced on Wednesday, could have a chance of passing.

James Clark

James Clarkis the Deputy Editor of Task & Purpose and a Marine veteran. He oversees daily editorial operations, edits articles, and supports reporters so they can continue to write the impactful stories that matter to our audience. In terms of writing, James provides a mix of pop culture commentary and in-depth analysis of issues facing the military and veterans community. Contact the author here.

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