Wikileaks' Julian Assange Reportedly Tried To Get A Russian Visa

Code Red News
Wikimedia Commons

Wikileaks founder Julian Assange reportedly tried to obtain a Russian visa in 2010, according to the Associated Press.


In a letter to the Russian consulate in London obtained by AP dated Nov. 30, 2010, Assange wrote: "I, Julian Assange, hereby grant full authority to my friend, Israel Shamir, to both drop off and collect my passport, in order to get a visa." The AP also obtained a notarized copy of Assange's Australian passport, which was mentioned in his letter.

U.S. officials have long maintained that Wikileaks has received support from Russian intelligence, or as then-CIA Director Mike Pompeo put it in 2016, was a "hostile intelligence service" in and of itself. But even before the site began dumping thousands of hacked emails from the Democratic National Committee during the 2016 election, Assange has cultivated a number of ties to Moscow.

First and foremost is the name Assange mentions in the consular letter: Israel Shamir. A longtime friend and employee of Wikileaks, the Russian-born Shamir was tasked in 2010 with disseminating documents stolen by Chelsea Manning to Russian news organizations and other Baltic states. The details, according to Vox:

The first thing Shamir did with the documents was hand some off to Russian Reporter magazine, a Kremlin-friendly newsweekly. He then offered to sell access to them to the highest bidder, David Leigh and Luke Harding write in the book Wikileaks: Inside Julian Assange’s War on Secrecy.

But what he did next was exceptionally curious. Shamir traveled to Belarus, a country ruled by dictator Alexander Lukashenko and perhaps Putin’s staunchest ally in Europe. Shamir was a fan of Lukashenko; in a 2010 piece, he called Belarus “the Shangri-la of the post-Soviet development.”

In Belarus, Shamir shared State Department cables pertaining to the country with government officials — in unredacted, unedited form.

Assange was later personally defended in the media by Russian President Vladimir Putin, and in 2012, got his own television show on Russia Today (RT).

The official Wikileaks Twitter account, which many believe to be controlled directly by Assange, criticized the AP report in a tweet, saying that Assange "did not apply for such a visa at any time or author the document," alleging that a former Wikileaks volunteer fabricated it.

Shamir, however, said in a Russian radio interview in 2011 that he personally brokered a Russian visa for Assange, but it did not come in time for him to avoid the Swedish investigation into alleged sex crimes.

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs paid $13,000 over a three-month period for a senior official's biweekly commute to Washington from his home in California, according to expense reports obtained by ProPublica.

Read More Show Less
Saturday Night Live/screenshot

President Donald Trump said that "retribution" should be "looked into" after this week's opening skit of Saturday Night Live featured Alec Baldwin being mean to him again.

Read More Show Less
Staff Sgt. John Eller conducts pre-flights check on his C-17 Globemaster III Jan. 3 prior to taking off from Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii for a local area training mission. Sgt. Eller is a loadmaster from the 535th Airlift Squadron. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Shane A. Cuomo)

CUCUTA, Colombia — The Trump administration ratcheted up pressure Saturday on beleaguered Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro, dispatching U.S. military planes filled with humanitarian aid to this city on the Venezuelan border.

Read More Show Less
U.S. Secretary of Defense Patrick Shanahan speaks at the annual Munich Security Conference in Munich, Germany February 15, 2019. REUTERS/Andreas Gebert

ABOARD A U.S. MILITARY AIRCRAFT (Reuters) - Acting U.S. Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan said on Saturday he had not yet determined whether a border wall with Mexico was a military necessity or how much Pentagon money would be used.

President Donald Trump on Friday declared a national emergency in a bid to fund his promised wall at the U.S.-Mexico border without congressional approval.

Read More Show Less
A pair of U.S. Navy Grumman F-14A Tomcat aircraft from Fighter Squadron VF-211 Fighting Checkmates in flight over Iraq in 2003/Department of Defense

Since the sequel to the 1986 action flick (and wildly successful Navy recruitment tool) Top Gun, was announced, there's been a lot of speculation on what Top Gun: Maverick will be about when it premieres in June 2020. While the plot is still relatively unclear, we know Tom Cruise will reprise his role as Naval aviator Pete "Maverick" Mitchell, and he'll be joined by a recognizable costar: The iconic F-14 Tomcat.

It looks like the old war plane will be coming out of retirement for more than just a cameo. A number of recently surfaced photos show an F-14 Tomcat aboard the USS Theodore Roosevelt, alongside Cruise and members of the film's production crew, the Drive's Tyler Rogoway first reported earlier this week.

Read More Show Less