Roughly 320 US troops are deploying to the border as caterers, drivers, and lawyers

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U.S. Army Soldiers with the 289th Composite Supply Company, prep food and water for transport to Camp Donna at Weslaco, Texas, Nov. 23, 2018. Soldiers will provide a range of support including planning assistance, engineering support, equipment and resources to assist the Department of Homeland Security along the southwest border. (U.S. Air Force/SrA Alexandra Minor0

The Pentagon is sending about 320 more troops to the southwestern border, and although they will interact with migrants, they will not arrest or detain anyone, a Defense Department spokesman said on Monday.


"In any situation that requires DoD personnel to be in proximity to migrants, DHS [Department of Homeland Security] law enforcement personnel will be present to conduct all custodial and law enforcement functions, and provide force protection of military personnel," said Army Lt. Col. Jamie Davis.

Instead, the new troops will transport migrants, perform legal functions, and provide food and heat to those in the custody of the U.S. Customs and Border Protection personnel who actually perform law enforcement functions at the border, Davis said.

Currently, about 2,900 active-duty and 2,000 National Guardsmen are deployed along the U.S.-Mexico border to string concertina wire and build barricades to help civil authorities, Davis said.

Separately, President Donald Trump plans to use $6.1 billion from the Defense Department counter-narcotics and military construction funds to build a wall along the border.

Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan has tasked the Pentagon's comptroller with identifying which military construction projects could be delayed to pay for the wall by May 10.

SEE ALSO: The Army Just Awarded $976 Million In Contracts For Border Wall Construction

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The Pentagon has identified the two soldiers were killed in combat in Afghanistan on Wednesday as members of U.S. Army Special Forces.

Master Sgt. Luis F. DeLeon-Figueroa, 31, and Master Sgt. Jose J. Gonzalez, 35, both died in Faryab Province from wounds sustained from small arms fire, the Pentagon said in a press release. The incident is under investigation.

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JERUSALEM (Reuters) - Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu hinted on Thursday of possible Israeli involvement in attacks against Iranian-linked targets in Iraq.

A series of blasts in the past few weeks have hit weapon depots and bases belonging to paramilitary groups in Iraq, many of them backed by Israel's regional foe Iran. The groups blamed the United States and Israel for the blasts on Wednesday.

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White House/Shealah Craighead

President Donald Trump signed an executive order on Wednesday that will make it easier for permanently disabled veterans to have their student loan debt forgiven.

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Capt. Tranay Lashawn Tanner. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Editor's Note: This article by Oriana Pawlyk originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

Physical fitness tests were briefly suspended earlier this week and outdoor cardio testing will be curtailed for the remainder of the summer at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, after an airman died Saturday. She had completed her PT test on Friday.

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(DoD photo)

Navy Secretary Richard Spencer has expanded a review of the Judge Advocate General Corps to include the Marine Corps, a Navy spokesman said on Thursday.

"There is value in applying this review and its subsequent recommendations across the Department of the Navy," Cmdr. Jereal Dorsey told Task & Purpose. "The review's purpose is to confirm the uniformed legal community is structurally and organizationally sound and best supporting the good order and discipline our integrated naval force."

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