Rep. Duncan Hunter says his unit probably killed 'hundreds' of civilians in Iraq, including women and children

news

Rep. Duncan Hunter, R-Calif.

Photo: Denis Poroy/AP

Rep. Duncan Hunter (R-Calif.) is at it again. And by "it," I mean willingly offering up information about questionable shit he did while he served as a Marine.


In an interview for Barstool Sports' Zero Blog Thirty podcast, Hunter was asked about his support of Navy SEAL Chief Edward "Eddie" Gallagher, who has been accused of war crimes including stabbing a captured ISIS fighter to death.

Hunter responded that he "frankly [doesn't] care" if the ISIS fighter was killed, and that "even if everything the prosecutors say is true in this case, then Eddie Gallagher should still be given a break, I think."

"I just feel like it's such a slippery slope, and it goes against our honor so egregiously if that is the case," one of the hosts, also a former Marine, said to Hunter.

"So how do you judge me?" He responded. "I was an artillery officer and we fired hundreds of rounds into Fallujah, killed probably hundreds of civilians, if not scores, if not hundreds of civilians. Probably killed women and children if there were any left in the city when we invaded. So do I get judged too?"



The Pentagon has been forced to reckon with its civilian casualty problem in recent months. In February, Washington Post reported that the department "launched a major examination" after criticism that it has failed to protect innocent civilians in counterterrorism operations. In 2017, then-Defense Secretary Jim Mattis "stressed the Pentagon's commitment to keeping civilians safe," the Post reports, though he admitted that zero casualties "has never been achieved before in warfare."

But Hunter's comments appear to suggest that civilian casualties, including women and children, are simply an unavoidable part of warfare regardless of DoD policy. And the circumstances he's referring to — indiscriminate artillery fire during an engagement with the enemy — is entirely different than the purposeful murder of one specific prisoner that Gallagher is accused of (Hunter's office did not respond to request for comment from Task & Purpose).

Hunter has a knack for openly admitting to questionable things he did during his time in the U.S. armed forces; he recently said that he, too, took a photo with the corpse of an enemy combatant, another one of the crimes Gallagher is accused of.

SEE ALSO: 3 members of Navy SEAL Chief Eddie Gallagher's defense team have close ties to Trump

WATCH NEXT: A Navy SEAL Is Accused Of Committing War Crimes In Iraq

U.S. Air Force/Staff Sgt. Sandra Welch

This article originally appeared on Military.com.

Inside Forward Operating Base Oqab in Kabul, Afghanistan stands a wall painted with a mural of an airman kneeling before a battlefield cross. Beneath it, a black gravestone bookended with flowers and dangling dog tags displays the names of eight U.S. airmen and an American contractor killed in a horrific insider attack at Kabul International Airport in 2011.

It's one of a number of such memorials ranging from plaques, murals and concrete T-walls scattered across Afghanistan. For the last eight years, those tributes have been proof to the families of the fallen that their loved ones have not been forgotten. But with a final U.S. pullout from Afghanistan possibly imminent, those families fear the combat-zone memorials may be lost for good.

Read More Show Less
DOD photo

After a string of high profile incidents, the commander overseeing the Navy SEALs released an all hands memo stating that the elite Naval Special Warfare community has a discipline problem, and pinned the blame on those who place loyalty to their teammates over the Navy and the nation they serve.

Read More Show Less
Ed Mahoney/Kickstarter

In June 2011 Iraq's defense minister announced that U.S. troops who had deployed to the country would receive the Iraq Commitment Medal in recognition of their service. Eight years later, millions of qualified veterans have yet to receive it.

The reason: The Iraqi government has so far failed to provide the medals to the Department of Defense for approval and distribution.

A small group of veterans hopes to change that.

Read More Show Less
F-16 Fighting Falcon (Photo: US Air Force)

For a cool $8.5 million, you could be the proud owner of a "fully functioning" F-16 A/B Fighting Falcon fighter jet that a South Florida company acquired from Jordan.

The combat aircraft, which can hit a top speed of 1,357 mph at 40,000 feet, isn't showroom new — it was built in 1980. But it still has a max range of 2,400 miles and an initial climb rate of 62,000 feet per minute and remains militarized, according to The Drive, an automotive website that also covers defense topics, WBDO News 96.5 reported Wednesday.

Read More Show Less