Gary Sinise (Photo courtesy of the Gary Sinise Foundation)

Gary Sinise may be best known for his role as Lt. Dan in Forrest Gump, but in the 25 years since the Oscar-winning film's debut, he's leveraged his stardom to give back to the military and veterans community through the Gary Sinise Foundation.

On Dec. 7, Sinise's foundation partnered with American Airlines to fly more than 1,700 Gold Star family members from across the country to Orlando, Florida, for a five-day Christmas vacation to Disney World.

Read More Show Less
The welcome sign at Naval Air Station Corpus Christi (Facebook photo)

An armed suspect was taken into custody at Naval Air Station Corpus Christi on Wednesday morning after a brief lockdown period, according to the Texas base's Facebook account.

Though the exact nature of the incident is unclear, base officials wrote that no shots were fired and no injuries were reported.

Read More Show Less
Aviation Ordnanceman Airman Byron Foster takes clean silverware from the scullery to the chow line aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) January 24, 2012 (Navy photo/Petty Officer 2nd Class Dean Cates)

WASHINGTON – A $738 billion defense bill agreed to by House and Senate negotiators Monday night contains a provision that will boost a small Upstate New York company that serves as America's last flatware maker, according to Rep. Anthony Brindisi.

The National Defense Authorization Act for fiscal 2020 includes Brindisi's amendment requiring the military to buy American-made eating utensils for its installations around the world.

Sherrill Manufacturing in Oneida County is the only U.S. manufacturer that makes and sources 100 percent of its flatware domestically.

Read More Show Less
Spc. Woo Jung, Company A, 603rd Aviation Support Battalion, 3rd Combat Aviation Brigade, shows the difference of water quality after being processed utilizing the Tactical Water Purification System during a training exercise on Hunter Army Airfield Jan. 27. (U.S. Army/Spc. Scott Lindblom)

Congress has reached a deal on a spending bill that would require the military to stop using firefighting foam containing toxic chemicals linked to cancer, but would abandon efforts to place stronger regulations on the chemicals.

The bill, called the National Defense Authorization Act, has been the focus of intense negotiations for months. House Democrats saw it as their best chance to force President Trump's Environmental Protection Agency to increase its oversight of a class of chemicals, called perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances — commonly known as PFAS — that have contaminated drinking water sources across the country.

Senate Republicans resisted these measures, wary of forcing chemical companies and the Defense Department to undertake extensive cleanups.

But when hopes of a compromise faded last week, Democrats were left with little choice but to agree to significantly weaker provisions or kill the entire defense spending bill.

The bill that emerged out of a joint House-Senate committee this week had been stripped of measures that would require the EPA to designate the chemicals as "hazardous" and set a nationwide safety standard for PFAS in drinking water.

Read More Show Less
Afghan security forces inspect the site of an attack in a U.S. military air base in Bagram, north of Kabul, Afghanistan December 11, 2019. (REUTERS/Mohammad Ismail)

KABUL (Reuters) - Suicide bombers struck the main U.S. military base in Afghanistan on Wednesday, killing at least one person and injuring scores in a major attack that could scupper plans to revive peace talks between the United States and the Taliban.

The Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack, which struck the Bagram air base north of Kabul.

"First, a heavy-duty Mazda vehicle struck the wall of the American base," said Zabihullah Mujahid, a Taliban spokesman. "Later several mujahideen equipped with light and heavy weapons were able to attack the American occupiers."

Read More Show Less
(Associated Press/Tom Williams)

Ronny Jackson, the former White House physician and retired Navy rear admiral who had a short run as the nominee for the Department of Veterans Affairs in 2018, now plans to run for a seat in Congress.

Read More Show Less