(U.S. Army/Sgt. 1st Class Ben Navratil)

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump asked the U.S. Supreme Court to clear his administration to start using Pentagon funds for construction of more than 100 miles of fencing along the Mexican border.

Filing an emergency request Friday, the president asked the justices to lift a freeze on the money while a legal fight with the Sierra Club and another advocacy group plays out.

The request marks the first time the Supreme Court has been confronted with the dispute stemming from Trump's declaration of a national emergency in February to free up federal money for his border wall.

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Some people are freaking the fuck out over what is basically going to be four tanks and a couple of armored personnel carriers rolling around in Washington for Independence Day.

Sure, bringing in tanks to celebrate the 4th of July could be criticized as misguided given it's not explicitly a military holiday, or perhaps, it could be said that it's a waste of taxpayer money.

But to observe some of the reaction to Trump wanting some armor around to look at, you would think he had just ordered the burning of Congress and the imposition of martial law.

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REUTERS/Mike Blake

President Donald Trump said in a congratulatory tweet on Wednesday morning that he was "glad he could help" Navy SEAL Chief Eddie Gallagher, a day after Gallagher was found not guilty of murder but found guilty of posing for a photo with a corpse.

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(Reuters/Kevin Lamarque)

DUBAI/VIENNA (Reuters) - Iran announced on Monday it had amassed more low-enriched uranium than permitted under its 2015 nuclear deal with world powers, drawing a warning from U.S. President Donald Trump that Tehran was "playing with fire."

Tehran's announcement marked its first major step beyond the terms of the pact since the United States pulled out of it more than a year ago. However, Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif said the move was not a violation of the accord, arguing that Iran was exercising its right to respond to the U.S. walkout.

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REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

PANMUNJOM/SEOUL, South Korea (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump became the first sitting U.S. president to set foot in North Korea on Sunday when he met its leader, Kim Jong Un, in the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) between the two Koreas and agreed to resume stalled nuclear talks.

The meeting, initiated by a spur-of-the-moment tweet by Trump that Kim said took him by surprise, once again displayed the rapport between the two. But they are no closer to narrowing the gap between their positions since they walked away from their summit in February in Vietnam.

The two men shook hands warmly and expressed hopes for peace when they met for the third time in just over a year on the old Cold War frontier that for decades has symbolized the hostility between their countries, which are technically still at war.

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REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji/File Photo

OSAKA/SEOUL (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump on Saturday proposed a weekend meeting with Kim Jong Un at the demilitarized zone (DMZ) between North and South Korea, an encounter North Korea said would be meaningful if it goes ahead.

If Trump and Kim do meet, it will be for the third time in just over a year, and four months after their second summit broke down with no progress on U.S. efforts to get North Korea to give up its nuclear weapons.

North Korea said it had not had an official proposal.

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