2 New Movies Are Profiling One Of The Military’s Most Heroic And Desperate Battles

Entertainment
The Oct. 3 2009 Battle of Kamdesh is the focus of two war films, one of which is based on "Red Platoon," by Medal of Honor Recipient Clint Romesha, pictured here.
CNN

The Battle of Kamdesh on Oct. 3, 2009, gave America a story of heroism and brotherhood, but at a terrible cost: Eight Americans were killed, and 27 were wounded. Now the fight that pitted a handful of soldiers at Combat Outpost Keating in eastern Afghanistan against several hundred enemy insurgents, is receiving the silver screen treatment, according to an exclusive by The Hollywood Reporter.


Titled The Outpost, the upcoming film by Millennium Media is expected to start production in August and is based on CNN anchor Jake Tapper’s best-seller of the same name. The Outpost will star Scott Eastwood (Pacific Rim: Uprising), Caleb Landry Jones (Get Out) and Orlando Bloom — you know, the guy from all the elf and pirate movies, though in his defense he’s not new to war flicks (Black Hawk Down).

Eastwood will take on the role of Medal of Honor recipient, Staff Sgt. Clint Romesha, and Jones will play Spec. Ty Carter, who also received the Medal of Honor for his actions that day. Bloom has been cast as 1st Lt. Benjamin D. Keating, who was killed Nov. 26, 2006 when his vehicle overturned — the camp where the 2009 battle took place was renamed in his memory.

Directed by Rod Lurie (The Contender, Commander In Chief), The Outpost will feature roles for veterans, both on and off set, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

“I am very proud to say that many of the actors we have already cast in the supporting roles are themselves veterans — as are crew members,” Lurie, an Army vet and West Point graduate himself, told the Reporter.

But Lurie’s film isn’t the only drama about CoP Keating in the works, either. Another war movie, this one backed by Sony, is titled Red Platoon and based on Romesha’s book of the same name.

As for The Outpost, filling out the cast with folks who talk the talk, walk the walk, and know which patches go where on a uniform is a bit of an overlooked, though hardly new, trend in big budget war films.

Related: A Hollywood Military Advisor Explains How Veterans Can Break Into Show Biz »

“I hope to continue that process,” Lurie added. “Mostly, though, I am just damn thrilled to be telling one of the most heroic stories of military survival ever recorded.”

And it might well be. At Combat Outpost Keating, an exposed camp at the base of three mountains in Afghanistan’s Nuristan province not far from the Pakistan border, a handful of soldiers with Bravo Troop, 3rd Squadron, 61st Cavalry Regiment of the 4th Infantry Division, fended off an attack by more than 300 Taliban fighters.

The desperate battle resulted in two Medals of Honor, 27 Purple Hearts, 37 Army Commendation Medals for valor, 18 Bronze Stars with “V,” and nine Silver Stars. As many as 150 enemy fighters were killed, according to Military.com.

“Think of the 300 Spartans in a modern war,” Lurie said. “That’s what this is.”

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(Task & Purpose photo illustration by Paul Szoldra)

Jordan Way was living a waking nightmare.

The 23-year-old sailor laid in bed trembling. At times, his body would shake violently as he sobbed. He had recently undergone a routine shoulder surgery on Dec. 12, 2017, and was hoping to recover.

Instead, Jordan couldn't do much of anything other than think about the pain. Simple tasks like showering, dressing himself, or going to the bathroom alone were out of the question, and the excruciating sensation in his shoulder made lying down to sleep feel like torture.

"Imagine being asleep," he called to tell his mother Suzi at one point, "but you can still feel the pain."

To help, military doctors gave Jordan oxycodone, a powerful semi-synthetic opiate they prescribed to dull the sensation in his shoulder. Navy medical records show that he went on to take more than 80 doses of the drug in the days following the surgery, dutifully following doctor's orders to the letter.

Instinctively, Jordan, a Navy corpsman who by day worked at the Twentynine Palms naval hospital where he was now a patient, knew something was wrong. The drugs seemed to have little effect. His parents advised him to seek outside medical advice, but base doctors insisted the drugs just needed more time to work.

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Two airmen from Vance Air Force Base, Oklahoma, were killed on Thursday when two T-38 Talon training aircraft crashed during training mission, according to a message posted on the base's Facebook age.

The two airmen's names are being withheld pending next of kin notification.

A total of four airmen were onboard the aircraft at the time of the incident, base officials had previously announced.

The medical conditions for the other two people involved in the crash was not immediately known.

An investigation will be launched to determine the cause of the crash.

Emergency responders from Vance Air Force Base are at the crash scene to treat casualties and help with recovery efforts.

Read the entire message below:

VANCE AIR FORCE BASE, Okla. – Two Vance Air Force Base Airmen were killed in an aircraft mishap at approximately 9:10 a.m. today.

At the time of the accident, the aircraft were performing a training mission.

Vance emergency response personnel are on scene to treat casualties and assist in recovery efforts.

Names of the deceased will be withheld pending next of kin notification.

A safety investigation team will investigate the incident.

Additional details will be provided as information becomes available. #VanceUpdates.

This is a breaking news story. It will be updated as more information is released.

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