'The Hurt Locker' is now on Netflix in case you needed a reminder of how much it sucks

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The Hurt Locker (2008) Official Trailer - Jeremy Renner, Anthony Mackie Movie HD

Get your television remote and your puke bucket ready, because The Hurt Locker is now on Netflix.

The 2008 film starring Jeremy Renner as an Army explosive ordnance disposal technician in Iraq, which wowed civilians while making military audiences collectively groan, is back on the streaming platform as of March 1.


Sure it won six Oscars, and was hailed as an amazing military flick by just about every movie critic under the sun. But that doesn't mean it isn't viewed as complete shit by the people it's supposed to depict. "[It's like] Top Gun," one Army EOD soldier told Task & Purpose, while noting it had great cinematography but plenty of technical inaccuracies. "If you know very little about the subject matter, it's a good movie."

The movie played hard and loose with what EOD actually does, as I noted in 2015. There are, of course, the minor errors like unit names, and then there are huge, glaring plot holes and/or complete idiocy from an EOD tech — like when Staff Sgt. James pulls up a bunch of red wires to reveal six bombs daisy-chained all around him, or when he decides to throw on a hoodie and just go walking around at night in Iraq with a 9mm pistol to win the war all by himself.

"Bravo Hollywood. That was pure magical bullshit," Kate Hoit, an Army veteran, wrote in 2010.

"How about the fact that the team leader is out of control? A [team leader] that 'cowboy' would be fired. His team member got shot because of him, good luck living with that," another EOD soldier told Task & Purpose, adding that they're not trained snipers; they usually, you know, roll around with security; and unfortunately, they don't have magical fire extinguishers that will put out a fire that has engulfed an entire vehicle.

But anyway, the movie is out on Netflix so go grab a beer and take a swig every time you notice something fucked up. You'll probably be passed out less than 30 minutes in.

"The Hurt Locker was not written for us. It was not produced or shot for us," Jason Dawson, a Marine Corps veteran, told War is Boring. "It was shot for people back home who have a very John Wayne, cowboy-esque view, the Wild West view, of what goes on in Iraq. These are characters that you drummed up, from behind a desk, and then you put them through scenarios that you imagined about what it's like 'over there.'"

SEE ALSO: Here's Why 'The Hurt Locker' Is The Worst War Movie Of All Time

Former Army 1st Lt. Clint Lorance, whom President Donald Trump recently pardoned of his 2013 murder conviction, claims he was nothing more than a pawn whom generals sacrificed for political expediency.

The infantry officer had been sentenced to 19 years in prison for ordering his soldiers to open fire on three unarmed Afghan men in 2012. Two of the men were killed.

During a Monday interview on Fox & Friends, Lorance accused his superiors of betraying him.

"A service member who knows that their commanders love them will go to the gates of hell for their country and knock them down," Lorance said. "I think that's extremely important. Anybody who is not part of the senior Pentagon brass will tell you the same thing."

"I think folks that start putting stars on their collar — anybody that has got to be confirmed by the Senate for a promotion — they are no longer a soldier, they are a politician," he continued. "And so I think they lose some of their values — and they certainly lose a lot of their respect from their subordinates — when they do what they did to me, which was throw me under the bus."

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Fifteen years after the U.S. military toppled the regime of Saddam Hussein, the Army's massive two-volume study of the Iraq War closed with a sobering assessment of the campaign's outcome: With nearly 3,500 U.S. service members killed in action and trillions of dollars spent, "an emboldened and expansionist Iran appears to be the only victor.

Thanks to roughly 700 pages of newly-publicized secret Iranian intelligence cables, we now have a good idea as to why.

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(Associated Press photo)

BANGKOK (Reuters) - Defense Secretary Mark Esper expressed confidence on Sunday in the U.S. military justice system's ability to hold troops to account, two days after President Donald Trump pardoned two Army officers accused of war crimes in Afghanistan.

Trump also restored the rank of a Navy SEAL platoon commander who was demoted for actions in Iraq.

Asked how he would reassure countries such as Afghanistan and Iraq in the wake of the pardons, Esper said: "We have a very effective military justice system."

"I have great faith in the military justice system," Esper told reporters during a trip to Bangkok, in his first remarks about the issue since Trump issued the pardons.

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U.S. Army Rangers resting in the vicinity of Pointe du Hoc, which they assaulted in support of "Omaha" Beach landings on "D-Day," June 6, 1944. (Public domain)

Editor's Note: This article by Richard Sisk originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

For one veteran who fought through the crossfires of German heavy machine guns in the D-Day landings, receiving a Congressional Gold Medal on behalf of his service and that of his World War II comrades would be "quite meaningful."

Bills have been introduced in the House and Senate to award the Army Rangers of World War II the medal, the highest civilian award bestowed by the United States, along with the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

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An airman at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base was arrested and charged with murder on Sunday after a shooting at a Raleigh night club that killed a 21-year-old man, the Air Force and the Raleigh Police Department said.

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