Marines Confirm That Yes, They Drew That New Sky Penis Over California

Mandatory Fun

A Marine aircraft drew another penis in the sky, Marine Corps spokesman Maj. Brian Block confirmed on Tuesday.


The plane from the 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing was responsible for two phallic flight patterns noticed by a Twitter user, Block told Task & Purpose.

The T-34C came from Marine Fighter Attack Training Squadron 101, said Maj. Josef Patterson, a spokesman for 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing. It was not immediately clear how many aviators were in the plane at the time, he said.

“We’ve opened an investigation that is underway as we speak,” Patterson told Task & Purpose. “More to follow soon.”

This is the second confirmed sky dong since November 2017, when two Navy EA-18G Growler flew a hard pattern over Washington state, leaving contrails in the shape of a wang.

Vice Adm. Mike Shoemaker, former commander of Naval Air Forces, personally disciplined the two Navy aviators responsible for the original sky phallus at a Field Naval Aviator Evaluation Board. They were punished administratively and ordered to hold a series of “Change the Culture” briefs, to explain to their fellow crews how their actions fell far short of what was expected of them and what “strategic effects” their behavior could create.

“The American people rightfully expect that those who wear the wings of gold exhibit a level of maturity commensurate with the missions and aircraft with which they've been entrusted,” Shoemaker said at the time.

“Sophomoric and immature antics of a sexual nature have no place in Naval aviation today. We will investigate this incident to get all the facts and act accordingly. This event clearly stands in stark contrast to the way our aviators and sailors are performing with utmost professionalism, discipline and excellence from our carrier flight decks and expeditionary airfields around the world today”

Similar contrail patterns that appeared over Germany in April proved to be Freudian, but not phallic.

Statement From The 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing:

“A T-34C aircraft assigned to Marine Fighter Attack Training Squadron 101, 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing, flew an irregular flight pattern over the Salton Sea that resembled a phallic image. An investigation to uncover the facts and circumstances surrounding the incident is ongoing. The aircrew's chain of command are committed to maintaining an environment of professionalism, dignity and respect. The Marines and Sailors of 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing will perform at the highest levels expected of professional war fighters, and uphold our core values of honor, courage and commitment.”

SEE ALSO: Mischievous Navy Pilot In Hot Water For Drawing Enormous Penis In The Sky

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UPDATE: This story was updated at 8:51 p.m. on Oct. 23 to include a statement from the 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing.

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