Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan cleared in ethics probe

news

Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan has gotten the green light and has been cleared of wrongdoing by the Pentagon's Inspector General, which was investigating him for alleged inappropriate favoritism of Boeing — his former place of employment for over 30 years.


Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics (CREW) filed the complaint on March 13, saying Shanahan "prodded DOD to increase funding for Boeing-produced fighter jets in next year's budget."

The investigation kicked off shortly thereafter after complaints that Shanahan "allegedly took actions to promote his former employer...and disparage its competitors, allegedly in violation of ethics rules," a DoD IG spokesperson said at the time.

"We did not substantiate any of the allegations," said the IG report, which was released on Thursday. "We determined that Mr. Shanahan fully complied with his ethics agreements and his ethical obligations regarding Boeing and its competitors."

The IG office interviewed a total of 34 people, including Shanahan, for the investigation; they also "reviewed more than 5,600 pages of of unclassified documents and approximately 1,700 pages of classified documents."

One of the allegations was that Shanahan "repeatedly dumped" on Lockheed Martin's F-35, and called it "fucked up." The IG concluded on that point that Shanahan was speaking of the F-35 program, not the aircraft, and that his comments "were consistent with other comments about problems in the F-35 program made by other senior DoD officials."

The Washington Post reported in April that the White House was waiting for the ethics probe to conclude before President Donald Trump took steps to officially nominate Shanahan as Defense Secretary.

When asked by Task & Purpose if Shanahan expected to be nominated soon, given the conclusion of the investigation, his spokesman Lt. Col. Joe Buccino responded: "Who knows, Haley?"

SEE ALSO: This Air Force slide shows how the F-35 became a bottomless money pit from which there is no escape

WATCH NEXT: Trump Scolds NATO On Defense Spending

Acting SecDef Patrick Shanahan. Photo: Lisa Ferdinando/DoD

Human civilization is about fire. Creating fire is what separates us from the animals; extinguishing it without urinating on it, according to Sigmund Freud, marked the starting point for the most fundamental societies. It is also, at its core, a force of destruction — and, therefore, a weapon of war.

Anyway.

Read More Show Less
(U.S. Army/Staff Sgt. True Thao)

Army researchers have devised a method to produce ceramic body armor, lightweight but strong, from a 3D printer. Except that 3D printers are meant to print out knickknacks, not flak jackets — which meant that engineers had to hack into the printer to get the job done.

Read More Show Less

There are #squadgoals, and then there are squad goals — and only one of them includes a potential future accompanied by autonomous murderbots.

Hot on the heels of the Marine Corps's head-to-toe overhaul of infantry rifle squads, a handful of grunts at the Air Ground Combat Center at Twentynine Palms, California recently conducted field testing alongside a handful of autonomous robots engineered by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's (DARPA) Squad X Experimentation program.

Read More Show Less
Paul Szoldra/Task & Purpose

Navy SEAL Chief Eddie Gallagher dodged the most serious charges the Navy threw at him during his court martial, but his final sentence could be far worse than what the jury originally handed down.

If the convening authority approves the jury's sentence of four months' confinement and a reduction in rank from E7 to E6, Gallagher will be busted down to the rank of E1, according to Navy officials.

Read More Show Less

An otherwise sleepy confirmation hearing for Defense Secretary nominee Mark Esper was jolted from its legislative stupor after Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) grilled the former Raytheon lobbyist on ethical issues regarding his involvement with his former employer.

Read More Show Less