It looks like the JLTV won't fully replace the Humvee after all

Military Tech

The Army may bill its brand new Joint Light Tactical Vehicle as a replacement to the much-maligned Humvee, but soldiers will remain stuck with the latter for the foreseeable future.


Army undersecretary Ryan McCarthy confirmed on Wednesday that service plans on buying 25% fewer of the fancy vehicles than it did last year as one of the 93 Pentagon programs facing reduced funding for a $30 billion modernization push.

In light of the Army's new modernization push and the "high-intensity land conflict" requirements posed by the return of Great Power competition, the branch's ground fleet mix will consist of 55,000 Humvees, 49,000 JLTVs, and 800 Infantry Squad Vehicles by 2028.

"The JLTV is a new vehicle – more survivable than a Humvee, more maneuverable than an MRAP," McCarthy said during remarks at the Brookings Institution on Thursday. "There's no doubt the Army needs it in the future – just not at the numbers of the original program of record when the requirements of a high-intensity land conflict are considered."

Backing away from the JLTV in the name of "modernization" is a bit ironic considering that, as Military.com notes, both the Army and Marine Corps made the program a modernization priority after the Humvee proved incapable of providing adequate protection against IEDs in Iraq and Afghanistan.

"We clearly have more capability than we need," McCarthy said on Wednesday.

Raider Master Drivers hit the tank trails during the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) Operator New Equipment Training (OPNET) at Fort Stewart, GA(U.S. Army/Maj. Peter Bogart)

The JLTV rollout has been plagued with worrying errors in recent years. According to the Congressional Research Service, a May 2018 Pentagon inspector general report found that the Army and Marines "had not demonstrated effective test results to prepare the JLTV program for full rate production."

The latest assessment of JLTV conducted by Pentagon's operational testing and evaluation arm indicated that the Army's current vehicles "are not operationally suitable because of deficiencies in reliability, maintainability, training, manuals, crew situational awareness, and safety."

It's worth noting that after the first fielding of the JLTV to soldiers back in January, a spokesperson for Humvee manufacturer AM General told Task & Purpose that despite the Army's framing, the JLTV wasn't a "replacement" for the Humvee but an "augmentation" of light tactical vehicle requirements.

The bottom line for soldiers in the field is that there will be fewer JLTVs to go around; apparently you'll have to wait your turn for a smooth ride and a cupholder.

SEE ALSO: Soldiers Say The JLTV Drives Like A Dream. Army Leaders Think That's A Problem

WATCH NEXT: The JLTV Goes For A Ride

The U.S. Embassy in Iraq (Reuters/Lucas Jackson)

BAGHDAD (Reuters) - A rocket was fired in Iraqi capital Baghdad's heavily-fortified Green Zone, which houses government buildings and foreign embassies, but caused no casualties, the Iraqi military said on Sunday.

A blast was heard in central Baghdad on Sunday night, Reuters witnesses said and two Baghdad-based diplomatic sources also said they heard the blast.

Read More Show Less

Officers from the California Highway Patrol arrested a homeless man Thursday morning after he allegedly threw a stolen Caltrans tripod onto Interstate 5 in downtown Sacramento, endangering the occupants of a van as it crashed through its windshield.

The incident happened just after 10:30 a.m., when the Caltrans survey tripod was stolen from the corner of Neasham Circle and Front Street, CHP South Sacramento said in a news release.

Read More Show Less
(U.S. Army/ Sgt. Mike MacLeod)

KABUL (Reuters) - Afghanistan's parliament descended into chaos on Sunday when lawmakers brawled over the appointment of a new speaker, an inauspicious start to the assembly which was sitting for the first time since chaotic elections last year.

Results of last October's parliamentary election were only finalized earlier this month after repeated technical and organizational problems and widespread accusations of fraud.

Read More Show Less
FILE PHOTO: The Carl Vinson VA Medical Center iin Dublin, Georgia

RIVIERA BEACH — When a distraught patient opened fire at the VA Medical Center in February, Albert Gaines' long ago military training kicked into gear.

"When I saw the arm come up, I knew what was next, pow, pow, pow," said Gaines, who was doing his job, cleaning patient rooms, when gunfire erupted. "I hit the deck to minimize the target."

Now, three months after what his bosses at the hospital call "the active shooter incident," the 65-year-old Riviera Beach man still feels like a target is on him.

Read More Show Less

President Donald Trump could issue a pardon on Memorial Day for Navy SEAL Chief Eddie Gallagher, former Special Forces Maj. Matthew Golsteyn, and Marine Scout Snipers accused of urinating on Taliban corpses, the New York Times is reporting.

The White House is working with the Justice Department and military services to get the paperwork necessary for the pardons in order, according to the Times.

Read More Show Less