The guys who brought us 'Saving Private Ryan' and 'Jarhead' are making a WWI movie

Entertainment
Gun crew from Regimental Headquarters Company, 23rd Infantry, firing 37mm gun during an advance against German/Wikimedia Commons

The filmmakers who gave the world Saving Private Ryan, and Jarhead are shipping out to recreate World War I in the upcoming drama 1917.

The film will be produced by Steven Spielberg (Jaws, Indiana Jones, Jurassic Park, Saving Private Ryan) and directed by Sam Mendes (Jarhead, Skyfall, Spectre, Road to Perdition) — and the two are going to work on it as soon as next month.


The project secured permission last week to begin shooting at the Govan Graving Docks in Glasgow, Scotland, according to BBC News. Production is slated to start April 22 and last 10 weeks while they set up, film, then dismantle the set. It's unclear how much of the film will be shot in Glasgow. The film is expected to be released in December 2019.

Spielberg's production company Amblin is set to produce the movie, with Mendes signed on to both direct and cowrite the script, according to Den of Geek. It'll be his first time working on the writing front, where he'll be joined by Krysty Wilson-Cairns (Penny Dreadful).

Not much is known about the plot at this point in time, just that it takes place, unsurprisingly, in 1917, which is the year the United States officially entered the war. Based on IMDB's cast list, there are just two actors attached to major roles: Dean-Charles Chapman, who played Tommen Baratheon on Game of Thrones, and George MacKay (Captain Fantastic, 11.22.63).

Given that Speilberg is signed on to produce, we can hope to see his fingerprints, if not his signature style, which helped sear the opening scene of Saving Private Ryan into audience's memories by placing the audience in the center of the action, not as an idle spectator, but as a participant.

It's what Dale Dye, the military adviser on Saving Private Ryan, described as "asses and elbows" in a previous interview with Task & Purpose.

"That's how you tend to see firefights if you're involved in it," Dye said. "You see the other guy's butt and his elbows, and everybody's down as far as they can get."

With luck, we might see World War I told through the eyes of the young men who fought it as they scramble through mud-filled trenches, fumble with gas masks as a yellowish-green tide of gas rolls in, and stalk across no man's land under a creeping barrage of artillery, knowing that their enemy waits just yards ahead.

Couple that style with Mendes' ability to make a character's complex internal struggles compelling and relatable and his tendency toward vivid yet simple cinematography, and we might just get a movie that drops us right onto the Western front, and leaves us there for the duration, trapped in a fight that claimed millions of lives and left even more wounded.

SEE ALSO: 'They Shall Not Grow Old' Shows The Essence Of Grunt Life Hasn't Changed Much Since WWI

WATCH NEXT: They Shall Not Grow Old Trailer

(U.S. Army/Pfc. Hubert D. Delany III)

Two U.S. military service members were killed in Afghanistan on Wednesday, the Resolute Support mission announced in a press release.

Their identities are being withheld pending notification of next of kin, the command added.

A total of 16 U.S. troops have died in Afghanistan so far in 2019. Fourteen of those service members have died in combat including two service members killed in an apparent insider attack on July 29.

Two U.S. troops in Afghanistan have been killed in non-combat incidents and a sailor from the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln was declared dead after falling overboard while the ship was supporting operations in Afghanistan.

At least two defense contractors have also been killed in Afghanistan. One was a Navy veteran and the other had served in the Army.

Sylvester Stallone is back as John Rambo. Why? Because nothing is (ever) over with this guy.

Read More Show Less
Popular Mobilization Forces fighters wave flags in this June 2016 photo. (Wikimedia Commons/Tasnim News Agency)

BAGHDAD (Reuters) - Iraq's paramilitary groups on Wednesday blamed a series of recent blasts at their weapons depots and bases on the United States and Israel.

The statement from the Popular Mobilization Forces (PMF), the umbrella grouping of Iraq's mostly Shi'ite Muslim paramilitary groups, many of which are backed by Iran, said the United States had allowed four Israeli drones to enter the region accompanying U.S. forces and carry out missions on Iraqi territory.

Read More Show Less
Lake County Sheriff's Department

A U.S. Marine reservist has been charged with felony kidnapping, stalking, and criminal confinement after he allegedly kidnapped a 16-year-old Indiana girl and brought her to Arkansas.

Alexander Martin Curry-Fishtorn, 22, was charged Tuesday in Indiana's Lake Superior Court with 17 felonies and four misdemeanors, according to The Chicago Tribune. On Aug. 16, Fishtorn allegedly kidnapped the girl and drove her to a friend's house in Arkansas with an apparent plan to hold her there until she was 18, ABC 7 reported.

Read More Show Less
Robert Morris Levy (Associated Press/Washington County Sheriff's Department)

A former doctor at an Arkansas Veteran Affairs hospital was charged Tuesday with involuntary manslaughter in the deaths of three veterans to whom he allegedly provided false diagnoses.

Read More Show Less