The guys who brought us 'Saving Private Ryan' and 'Jarhead' are making a WWI movie

Entertainment
Gun crew from Regimental Headquarters Company, 23rd Infantry, firing 37mm gun during an advance against German/Wikimedia Commons

The filmmakers who gave the world Saving Private Ryan, and Jarhead are shipping out to recreate World War I in the upcoming drama 1917.

The film will be produced by Steven Spielberg (Jaws, Indiana Jones, Jurassic Park, Saving Private Ryan) and directed by Sam Mendes (Jarhead, Skyfall, Spectre, Road to Perdition) — and the two are going to work on it as soon as next month.


The project secured permission last week to begin shooting at the Govan Graving Docks in Glasgow, Scotland, according to BBC News. Production is slated to start April 22 and last 10 weeks while they set up, film, then dismantle the set. It's unclear how much of the film will be shot in Glasgow. The film is expected to be released in December 2019.

Spielberg's production company Amblin is set to produce the movie, with Mendes signed on to both direct and cowrite the script, according to Den of Geek. It'll be his first time working on the writing front, where he'll be joined by Krysty Wilson-Cairns (Penny Dreadful).

Not much is known about the plot at this point in time, just that it takes place, unsurprisingly, in 1917, which is the year the United States officially entered the war. Based on IMDB's cast list, there are just two actors attached to major roles: Dean-Charles Chapman, who played Tommen Baratheon on Game of Thrones, and George MacKay (Captain Fantastic, 11.22.63).

Given that Speilberg is signed on to produce, we can hope to see his fingerprints, if not his signature style, which helped sear the opening scene of Saving Private Ryan into audience's memories by placing the audience in the center of the action, not as an idle spectator, but as a participant.

It's what Dale Dye, the military adviser on Saving Private Ryan, described as "asses and elbows" in a previous interview with Task & Purpose.

"That's how you tend to see firefights if you're involved in it," Dye said. "You see the other guy's butt and his elbows, and everybody's down as far as they can get."

With luck, we might see World War I told through the eyes of the young men who fought it as they scramble through mud-filled trenches, fumble with gas masks as a yellowish-green tide of gas rolls in, and stalk across no man's land under a creeping barrage of artillery, knowing that their enemy waits just yards ahead.

Couple that style with Mendes' ability to make a character's complex internal struggles compelling and relatable and his tendency toward vivid yet simple cinematography, and we might just get a movie that drops us right onto the Western front, and leaves us there for the duration, trapped in a fight that claimed millions of lives and left even more wounded.

SEE ALSO: 'They Shall Not Grow Old' Shows The Essence Of Grunt Life Hasn't Changed Much Since WWI

WATCH NEXT: They Shall Not Grow Old Trailer

Barrett's bolt-action Multi-Role Adaptive Design (MRAD) system (Courtesy photo)

The Army is almost doubling its purchase of new bolt-action Precision Sniper Rifles as its primary anti-personnel sniper system of choice, according to budget documents.

Read More
(U.S. Air Force photo)

Air Force officials are investigating the death of a man near the north gate of the U.S. Air Force Academy on Saturday night after the NHL Stadium Series hockey game between the Avalanche and the Los Angeles Kings, military officials said Sunday.

Read More
(Navy photo / Chief Mass Communication Specialist Paul Seeber)

The Citizens of Ebey's Reserve (COER) is asking a federal judge to require the Navy to roll back the number of EA-18G Growler practice flights at Outlying Field Coupeville to pre-2019 levels until a lawsuit over the number of Growler flights is settled.

COER and private citizen Paula Spina filed a motion for a preliminary injunction Thursday.

According to the motion, since March 2019 the Navy has increased the number of Growlers at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island and shifted most of its Growler operations to Outlying Field Coupeville, which is near the Reserve and the town of Coupeville.

"The result is a nearly fourfold increase in Growler flights in that area. Now the overflights subject residents in and near Coupeville to extreme noise for several hours of the day, day and night, many days of the week," said the court document.

Read More
An F-16 Fighting Falcon assigned to the 18th Aggressor Squadron taxis down the runway during Sentry Aloha 20-1 at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, Jan. 15, 2020. (U.S. Air Force/Senior Airman Beaux Hebert)

A 26-year-old man died after he failed to surface from waters off Molokai while participating in a scuba diving tour over the weekend.

He has been identified as Duane Harold Parsley II and was stationed at Hickam Air Force Base, according to the Maui Police Department.

Read More
Manzanar, the first of ten such concentration camps established by Executive Order No. 9066 on February 19, 1942. (Dorothea Lange for the War Relocation Authority)

LOS ANGELES — For decades, Japanese American activists have marked Feb. 19 as a day to reflect on one of the darkest chapters in this nation's history.

On that date in 1942, during World War II, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt authorized the forced removal of over 120,000 Americans of Japanese descent from their homes and businesses.

On Thursday, the California Assembly will do more than just remember.

Read More